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Seven ways Saudi Arabia is silencing people online

Posted in: Saudi Arabia
    Friday, January 23, 2015 - 11:46

    Raif Badawi is sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes for setting up a website in Saudi Arabia.

    Amnesty International spoke with another local blogger – who has to remain anonymous for their own safety – about different tactics the authorities use to silence people online.
     

    1. Gagging anyone with an independent opinion

    "Overall, the situation in Saudi Arabia is very bad, particularly from the point of view of people with independent opinions who go against the grain. Recently, there have been investigations, arrests and short-term detentions of journalists, athletes, poets, bloggers, activists and tweeters."
     

    2. Blaming everything on terrorism

    "The authorities are fragile. They seek to gag and stifle dissent using various means, including the shameful Terrorism Law that has become a sword waved in the faces of people with opinions. Courts issue prison sentences of 10 years or more as a result of a single tweet. Atheists and people who contact human rights organisations are attacked as 'terrorists'."
     

    3. Personal attacks on bloggers

    "I have been harassed in many ways. The authorities approached the internet providers hosting my personal website and asked them to block it and delete all the content. They also dispatched security officers to tell me to stop what I was doing in my own and my family's best interests. I was later officially banned from blogging and threatened with arrest if I continued. I succumbed and stopped in order to protect my family."
     

    4. Bans, false accusations and being fired from your jobs

    "There are many cases of bloggers being restricted or banned. Some of them – whom I know – are still being investigated about blogs they wrote in 2008, even though they aren't involved in blogging anymore. Saudi bloggers can also be fired from their jobs and prevented from making a living. Many face false allegations they they are 'atheists' or 'demented'. Restrictions are imposed on almost every aspect of the blogger's life."
     

    5. Far-reaching online surveillance and censorship

    "Censorship is at its maximum, especially after passing the Terrorism Law. A poet was arrested as a result of a single tweet which indirectly criticized King Abdullah using symbolic language. With millions of web users in Saudi Arabia, this means the authorities are keeping an eye on everything that's being written. We have also received reports through international newspapers that Saudi Arabia uses surveillance to hack and monitor activists' accounts."
     

    6. Deploying an electronic army

    "The authorities have powerful cyber armies which give a false impression of the situation in Saudi Arabia to deceive people overseas. They launch websites, YouTube channels and blogs to target activists and opponents, and depict them as atheists, infidels and agents who promote disobedience of the Ruler. By contrast, these websites, channels and blogs often praise the state and its efforts. I have personally been the victim of such state orchestrated campaigns that harmed my reputation.
     

    7. Brutal punishments

    "Raif Badawi's case further demonstrates the brutality of a state that still rules through punishments from the Middle Ages, like flogging, hefty fines and exaggerated prison terms. The Saudi government needs to know that it doesn't own the world and that it can't silence the world's voice with its money."

    Learn more about Amnesty International's work to free Raif Badawi

    Originally published by Amnesty International Australia

     

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