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Mexico

    October 09, 2014
    Justice for Ayotzinapa protest in Mexico City, 8 October 2014

    By Kathy Price, Mexico Campaigner

    The photos arrived in a steady stream on my Facebook feed, a flood of images too numerous to include here - impossible to ignore. From the wide boulevards of Mexico’s capital to the streets of small towns across the country, women and men, young and old, thousands and thousands of them, marched in protest, united in their outrage about what was done in Guerrero State.

    September 15, 2014
    Solidarity banner delivered to Claudia Medina (middle) from Amnesty Canada

    by Alex Neve, Secretary General, Amnesty International Canada
    -Mexico City, 15 September 2014.

    We could not have had a more powerful affirmation of how important solidarity is in our human rights work. 

    We passed over to Claudia Medina Tamariz a collection of messages from Amnesty supporters across Canada; greeting cards, letters, handwritten notes, and drawings.  We showed her some of the colourful messages that will be among the large number of petitions and letters turned over to Mexican officials later this month.  And we unfolded a vibrant yellow banner full of handprints and a message of solidarity, from an event held in Toronto in June.
     

    September 09, 2014

     

    by Alex Neve, Secretary General, Amnesty International Canada (English branch)
    - September 8, 2014, from Guadalajara, Mexico

    UPDATE: Ángel Colon was released in October 2014! He's now struggling for justice in his case and speaking out against torture in Mexico. Take Action >> Stand with Angel. 
     

    The prison we were about to visit loomed large and intimidating     Watch video of Angel Colon

    It had been a two and a half hour drive from Guadalajara. As we approached, the ominously named prison, CEFERESO Number 4, the Federal Centre for Social Rehabilitation, loomed large and intimidating at the bottom of one last hill.

    We spent the next hour going through the most extensive series of endless security checks I’ve been through in any prison visit, anywhere. It included a stamp on our forearms which only showed up under a special light, which we had to show again on our way out to demonstrate that none of us had stayed behind and allowed a prisoner to slip out in our place. There was, in fact, far more visible security than I have experienced on any of the visits I’ve made to the US detention centre at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba.

    May 13, 2014

    by Salil Shetty, Secretary General, Amnesty International
     

    “I am here to ask for your help,” said Claudia Medina when I met her in Mexico earlier this year. “I’m going to report a crime of torture.”

    Her words touched me, because I knew what Claudia had been through. At 3am on 7 August 2012, marines broke into the home she shared with her husband and three children. They tied her hands and blindfolded her, put her in a pick-up truck and took her to a naval base in Veracruz City. They accused her of being a member of a powerful and violent criminal gang, which she flatly denied.

    December 05, 2013
     President Enrique Peña Nieto addresses an international Business Summit in Guadalajara on 22 October 2013. (c)HECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Image
    By Kathy Price, Mexico campaigner with Amnesty International Canada

    This week marks one year since Enrique Peña Nieto became president of Canada’s free trade partner south of the Rio Grande, returning the reins of power to the notorious political party, the PRI, which held Mexico in an iron grip from 1929 to 2000.

    The always photogenic Peña Nieto campaigned on promises that he was the face of a new PRI and a new Mexico that would break with a history of corruption, inequality and violence. Once in office he announced an ambitious programme of reforms and promised he would end the exponential increase in human rights abuses during the presidency of his predecessor Felipe Calderón.

    One year later, it is clear that President Peña Nieto has not delivered on his promises. The situation on the ground remains increasingly dangerous and disturbing. “On the Peña Nieto train, human rights have so far had to settle for the third-class carriage,” concludes Javier Zúñiga, a special adviser with Amnesty International.

    June 04, 2013

    A mother’s tireless efforts to search for her missing son tell a tale of horror and hope in Mexico

    by Kathy Price, Amnesty International Canada's campaigner on Latin America

     

    More than two years have passed since I met Yolanda but I have never forgotten her or the harrowing story she told me.

    Yolanda’s son Dan Jeremeel, an insurance agent living in northern Mexico and the father of four young children, disappeared in December 2008.  He left the house according to his normal routine. But he never returned. He was never seen again.

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