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Argentina

    August 17, 2016

    A ruling to release a woman sentenced to eight years in prison after having a miscarriage in Argentina is a step forward for human rights in the country, Amnesty International said.

    Last night the Supreme Court of Tucumán, a state in north Argentina, said there were not enough reasons to keep Belén, 27, in pre-trial detention. The Supreme Court of Tucumán is yet to issue a final ruling on the eight-year sentence imposed on Belén by the lower court. Belén is expected to be released from jail today.

    “Belén’s release is extremely positive and long awaited news. What we need to see now is for the charges against her to be dropped. Belén should have never been held behind bars in the first place, having a miscarriage is not a crime,” said Mariela Belski, Executive Director at Amnesty International Argentina.

    On 26 July, Amnesty International handed over more than 120,000 petitions from across the globe to local authorities, urging for Belén to be released.

    Background Information

    May 28, 2016

    The sentencing of a former Argentinean military leader for his role in hundreds of enforced disappearances in the context of a region-wide intelligence operation must open the door to further investigations to bring all those responsible to justice, said Amnesty International.

    Former de facto President Reynaldo Bignone was sentenced to 20 years in prison by a court in Buenos Aires. Fourteen other military officers were also sentenced to prison terms.

    “This is a day for celebration in South America. This historic ruling sends the important message that justice will always prevail,” said Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas Director at Amnesty International.

    “Today’s ruling must be the first step towards real justice for the many victims of this Machiavellian operation, which left a long trail of suffering and horror throughout Latin America. Governments in countries who had a direct or indirect role in aiding Operation Condor must left no stone unturned to ensure all those responsible face justice so these terrible crimes never happen again.”

    May 06, 2016

     

    Fernanda Doz Costa, researcher on the Americas, reports from a protest outside a court in Argentina where “Belen” returns after being sentenced to eight years following a miscarriage.

    It was cold and grey the morning I arrived outside the courthouse in Tucumán city, northwest Argentina. Inside the court, a judge was delivering his reasons for why a woman known as “Belén” (not her real name) had been jailed after having a miscarriage.  

    Gradually the pavement where I was began to fill with colour. We were there to protest against Belén's conviction. Around me, flags bore slogans condemning gender discrimination. "This justice system is medieval", read signs amid the unmistakable green scarves of those campaigning for the decriminalization of abortion. There was even a replica "women's prison cell".

    When there was no more space on the pavement, demonstrators demanding Belén’s release blocked the road. Meanwhile the street band helped turn the feelings of anger and helplessness that had made us join this protest into an atmosphere of energy and unity.

     

    October 14, 2015

    The killing of three trans women in Argentina in the past month must trigger authorities into taking more robust action to protect one of the mostmarginalized communities in the country, said Amnesty International.

    Lastnight, Amancay Diana Sacayán, a renowed activist for the rights of lesbians, gays, bisexual and transgender people (LGBTI) was found dead in her flat in Argentina’s capital, Buenos Aires. Her body had signs of violence. A month ago, Marcela Chocobar and Coty Olmos, two trans women and leaders of LGBTIorganizations, were also violently killed in the provinces of Santa Fe and Santa Cruz.

    “Adark cloud has set over Argentina’s trans community. Unless this latest wave of murders is effectively investigated and those responsible taken to justice, a message will be sent that attacking trans women is actually ok,” said Mariela Belski, Executive Director at Amnesty International Argentina.

    October 14, 2015

     The killing of three trans women in Argentina in the past month must trigger authorities into taking more robust action to protect one of the mostmarginalized communities in the country, said Amnesty International.

    Lastnight, Amancay Diana Sacayán, a renowed activist for the rights of lesbians, gays, bisexual and transgender people (LGBTI) was found dead in her flat in Argentina’s capital, Buenos Aires. Her body had signs of violence. A month ago, Marcela Chocobar and Coty Olmos, two trans women and leaders of LGBTIorganizations, were also violently killed in the provinces of Santa Fe and Santa Cruz.

    “Adark cloud has set over Argentina’s trans community. Unless this latest wave of murders is effectively investigated and those responsible taken to justice, a message will be sent that attacking trans women is actually ok,” said Mariela Belski, Executive Director at Amnesty International Argentina.

    August 07, 2014

    Yesterday it was confirmed that Estela Barnes de Carlotto, founder of the organization Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo, recovered after 38 years of search her grandson who was abducted in June 1978.

    Estela´s daughter, Laura Carlotto, was kidnapped in November 1977, two months pregnant, together with her partner. Laura was able to hold her son for only 5 minutes and she named him Guido, after her father, Estela´s husband. In August 1978 Laura´s lifeless body was rendered to Estela (something unusual for the time).

    The tireless, courageous struggle of Estela and all of the Abuelas and Madres de Plaza de Mayo was a powerful source of inspiration during the years of state terror in Argentina and the years of impunity that followed, despite the return of fragile democracy. Led by indomitable women like Estela, the Madres and Abuelas never gave up hope of finding the children that were stolen from them and refused to be paralysed by fear, even when some of their ranks were also disappeared by the military.

    May 17, 2013

    Argentina’s former military leader, Jorge Rafael Videla, has died in prison, where he was serving a life sentence for crimes against humanity committed during his time in office.

    “Argentina led the way in the prosecution of those responsible for the torture, killing and disappearance of thousands of people during the many military governments across Latin America,” said Mariela Belski, Director of Amnesty International in Argentina.

    “We urge Argentina and other countries in the region to continue with their efforts to bring all those responsible for the terrible crimes committed during the region’s darkest years to justice. There is still much work to be done."

    Former military president Jorge Rafael Videla, 87, died this morning in the Marcos Paz prison in Buenos Aires.

    Last year, he was sentenced to 50 years in prison for his part in the systematic kidnapping of children during the country’s military regime between 1976 and 1983.

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