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Brunei Darussalam

    February 22, 2018
    Amnesty International publishes State of the World’s Human Rights report for 2017 to 2018 “Last year our world was immersed in crises, with prominent leaders offering us a nightmarish vision of a society blinded by hatred and fear. This emboldened those who promote bigotry, but it inspired far more people to campaign for a more hopeful future,” says Salil Shetty, head of Amnesty International

    The world is reaping the terrifying consequences of hate-filled rhetoric that threatens to normalize massive discrimination against marginalized groups, Amnesty International warned today as it launched its annual assessment of human rights.

    Nevertheless, the organization found that a growing movement of both first-time and seasoned activists campaigning for social justice provides real hope of reversing the slide towards oppression.

    The report, The State of the World’s Human Rights, covers 159 countries and delivers the most comprehensive analysis of the state of human rights in the world today.

    April 30, 2014

    Brunei Darussalam’s shocking new Penal Code will take the country back to the dark ages when it comes to human rights, Amnesty International said.

    The new Penal Code, which is due to come into force on 1 May, allows for cruel and inhuman punishments including stoning to death, whipping and amputation.

    “Brunei Darussalam’s new Penal Code legalizes cruel and inhuman punishments. It makes a mockery of the country’s international human rights commitments and must be revoked immediately,” said Rupert Abbott, Deputy Asia-Pacific Director at Amnesty International.

    The law imposes the death penalty for a range of offences which do not meet the threshold of the “most serious crimes” under international law, including robbery. Defendants who were under 18 years of age when crimes were committed can also be sentenced to death.

    “The new code even permits stoning to death for acts which should not be considered ‘crimes’ in the first place, such as extramarital sexual relations and consensual sex between adults of the same gender,” said Rupert Abbott.

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