Select this search icon to access the amnesty.ca search form

Main menu

Facebook Share

Canada

     

    OTTAWA - With federal political parties preparing for an election year, Amnesty International and the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) are calling on Canadians to help make ending violence against Aboriginal women and girls a priority for all politicians. Our organizations will be working with women’s organizations and other allies across Canada to ensure that all parties make tangible commitments to end violence against Indigenous women and girls in the upcoming election.

    Recently released RCMP statistics report the murder of 1017 Aboriginal women and girls between 1980 and 2012, with more than 100 others remaining missing under suspicious circumstances or for unknown reasons.

    NWAC President Michèle Audette told a press conference on Parliament Hill today. “Each woman was somebody. She was also somebody’s sister, daughter, mother, or friend and every one of them deserved to be safe from violence. They deserve more from our Government than excuses and a patchwork of underfunded and inadequate programs and services. We need solutions and actions that will make a difference in women’s lives.”

    Let the Indigenous peoples of the Peace River valley know that you stand with them in their fight against the Site C dam

    Join our global campaigning on Site C by sending a solidarity message or photograph of yourself to show you support their struggle to protect their ancestral lands.

    Add your photo or message to this page by posting on twitter or instagram using the hashtag #withthePeaceRiver.

    What would resource extraction and development look like if the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was implemented in Canada? This panel attempts to answer that question. We'll hear from Indigenous rights advocates and legal experts about what UNDRIP is, how it has been contravened by projects like the Site C dam in BC and the Alton Gas project in Nova Scotia, and processes developed by Indigenous communities to give, or withhold, consent. Panelists will discuss the topic in broad terms as well as offer specific insights to ongoing projects and resistance movements. This event is co-sponsored by the Council of Canadians and Halifax Public Libraries. 

    A spirited celebration of the contributions of refugees to Ottawa, and of our community's welcome for refugees.  The event is an Open House at Amnesty’s beautiful historic building on Laurier Avenue East and will present an opportunity for the general public to engage in activism for refugee rights.  Inspiring speakers. Light refreshments.  Live music.

    New Canadians Bushra Alarim and Husam Aldakhil will speak about their experience of being welcomed in Ottawa.  Alex Neve, Secretary General of Amnesty International Canada, will open the event.

    We are delighted that Surai Tea will provide its organic jasmine scented teas, handcrafted in Canada and packaged by Syrian-Canadian refugees.

    Musical appearances by Lee Hayes VOX! and by Adesso

    Mark World Refugee Day with us! 

    Join the Facebook event. 

     

    Speaker Bios

     

    Children in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) inhale toxic dust as they mine the cobalt that powers the batteries we rely on for our phones and laptops. Yet electronics manufacturers – global brands including Apple and Samsung – won’t tell us if their cobalt supply chains are tainted by child labour. They have a responsibility to do so –to check for and address child labour in their supply chains, setting an example for the rest of the industry to follow.

    TAKE ACTION

      Grassy Narrows: the right to a healthy environment

    "Everything around us was disappearing... The clean water, our way of life, our traditions, even the wild rice picking and blueberry picking were all disappearing. It's all connected to the land." - Judy DaSilva, Grassy Narrows

    "We have struggled for many years to save our way of life in the face of clear-cut logging, which has contaminated our waters and destroyed our lands. We cannot go back to the old way of business where decisions were imposed on our people and our land with devastating consequences for our health and culture.” -- Grassy Narrows trapper Joseph Fobister

    The flooding of their lands. The dumping of mercury into their waters. And the large scale logging of their traditional hunting and trapping territories.

    Clare Bayley’s provocative depiction of migrant smuggling won the Amnesty International Freedom of Expression Award for its unflinching and empathetic portrayal of the very human stories behind the statistics. 

    When the doors of the container shut behind you, let your eyes adjust as you meet five complex individuals: Fatima, Asha, Jemal, Ahmad and Mariam. You join them on the final leg of their voyage, as they are smuggled across Europe in the confined space of a shipping container. The only thing they have in common is their goal: to get to England and start a new life. Witness them torn between greed and generosity, watched over by the mysterious Agent who orchestrates their journey. With freedom so close, what price would you pay?

    Show runs from September 4-18, Thursday and Fridays at 6 & 9PM, Saturdays and Sundays at 3 & 6PM.

    Join us on Parliament Hill for the 6th Annual Families of Sisters in Spirit Vigil to honour the memory of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. 

    Details about other events and vigils in Ottawa on October 4th will be posted as more information becomes available. 

    Villagers protest against the mining project during a visit by Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu KyiMarch 13, 2013. Photo:REUTERS/Soe Zeya Tun Canadian mining company Ivanhoe Mines (now called Turquoise Hill Resources) lied publicly about its Myanmar joint venture selling copper to Burmese security forces, says a new report by Amnesty International. Ivanhoe Mines also used secrecy jurisdictions in the Caribbean to evade scrutiny over the sale of assets in Myanmar (Burma) and to dodge Canada’s economic sanctions against Myanmar at the time. A breach of these sanctions is a criminal offence.

    We're excited to announce that registration is now open for the 2016 Amnesty Youth Activist Conference in Saskatchewan. The goals of the Conference are to connect young activists and those interested in getting involved in human rights activism for a day of inspiration and learning!

    The Amnesty Youth Conference will take place in Saskatoon on Saturday, October 15 and in Regina on Sunday, October 16.

    The agenda will include: a panel discussion featuring experienced activists, Amnesty 101 (an introduction to Amnesty International), and a session on how to be a successful activist and what's next (using your activism skills after the conference). As well, we will hold workshops on Amnesty International's Cobalt campaign, refugee rights, Indigenous rights, and supporting human rights defenders in the Americas.

    The morning will start with yoga (optional) and registration at 9 am, with the program officially beginning at 9:45 am. The Conference will finish at 4:30 pm.

    What are your ideas for activism and public engagement? Are you a long-time supporter of Amnesty International, or new to our campaigns and actions? Maybe you’ve joined an Amnesty group at your school or in your community, organized a letter-writing event, raised money for Amnesty, or signed online actions.

    However you’ve been involved, this is your invitation to join with other activists and participate in a lively conversation focused on fostering human rights activism and organizing others.

    We’re looking for new and innovative ideas and plans that we can support and share with others across the country.

    Prior to each Roundtable we’ll provide a brief description of current and upcoming campaigns and the objectives and targets that go with them, and propose an agenda designed to open up discussion and encourage participants to bring forward their ideas for activism, creative actions, and public engagement.

    For more details please contact Elena Dumitru edumitru@amnesty.ca

    Gender, Indigenous rights, and energy development in northeast British Columbia, Canada

    Join Amnesty International's new campaign to make sure the safety and wellness of Indigenous women and girls in northeast BC, Canada, an area with massive hydroelectric, oil, gas, and coal projects, is not #OutofSightOutofMind! 

     

    Public symposium, online and in person
    9-5 pm, Wednesday, May 20th, University of Ottawa Participate in person or through a live, interactive webinar.

    Online:
    Please register to receive information by email on how to log in and submit your questions during the seminar.

    In Person:
    University of Ottawa, Fauteux Hall Room 147. Room opens for registration at 8:30 am on the 20th.

     

    If you are an Indigenous woman or girl in Canada—whether you live on reserve or in an urban area, regardless of your age or socio-economic status—the simple fact that you are an Indigenous woman or girl means that you are at least 3 times more likely to experience violence, and at least 6 times more likely to be murdered than any other woman or girl in Canada. This violence is a national human rights crisis and it must stop.

    Why are the rates of violence so high?

    Racist and sexist stereotypes lead perpetrators to believe that they can get away with committing acts of violence against Indigenous women and girls.

    The many legacies of colonialism increase the risk of experiencing violence—from impoverishment to the lasting harm from residential schools to the disempowerment of Indigenous women and girls in their own communities.

    Decades of government and law enforcement inaction to end the violence.

    The Paddle for the Peace is held annually to celebrate and recognize the need to protect the Valley and retain its critical ecosystem values in the face of the threat of the Site C dam.

    The Paddle is a day long event that begins on the Peace River, at the Halfway River Bridge on Highway 29, approximately a half hour drive from Fort St. John.

    You will start the day with a full, hearty breakfast, sponsored by the West Moberly First Nations at the launch site between 9 and 11 a.m. Following breakfast, keynote speakers and dignitaries will address the need to protect this precious valley.  The canoes and safety boats will launch at noon. You will enjoy a leisurely 1.5 hour paddle or cruise through this incredibly scenic river valley alongside hundreds of others who care deeply for it. The paddle culminates at Bear Flat and will be followed by a BBQ lunch hosted by the Prophet River First Nations, keynote speakers, musical entertainment as well as the opportunity to visit with other event participants.

    Pages

    Subscribe to Canada
    rights