Select this search icon to access the amnesty.ca search form

Main menu

Facebook Share

Canada

    December 19, 2012

    Canada has a strong record of accepting international obligations, including by ratifying most of the major international human rights treaties.  However, Canada’s record is less exemplary when it comes to complying with the findings and recommendations that come out of UN reviews.  Canada’s human rights record attracted considerable UN-level attention over the course of 2012.  The reviews covered a range of ongoing and very serious human rights concerns in the country. Amnesty International’s 2013 Human Rights Agenda for Canada is calling for concerted action to address this deepening concern. 

    Rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international instruments apply globally and equally to all people.  The integrity of the system depends on all countries, including Canada, living up to those obligations and being held accountable when they fail to do so.  It will require leadership.  It will require political will.  And it will require cooperation and coordination among federal, provincial and territorial governments.  But it cannot wait any longer. 

    November 21, 2012
    ‘Everything around us was disappearing... The clean water, our way of life, our traditions, even the wild rice picking and blueberry picking were all disappearing. It's all connected to the land.’ - Judy DaSilva, Grass Narrows

    It has been called one of the worst environmental disasters in Canadian history. Between 1962 and 1970, a mill in Dryden, Ontario dumped more than 9 metric tons of untreated inorganic mercury into the English and Wabigoon Rivers in Northwestern Ontario.

    These waters had been a source of both food and jobs for the people of Asubpeeschoseewagong (Grassy Narrows) and neighbouring First Nations. Community members had worked as guides and as staff in the many commercial fishing lodges. When the mercury dumping was discovered, the commercial fishery was closed, cutting the people off from their most important source of income.

    Even worse, it was discovered that many of the residents had greatly elevated levels of mercury in their bodies and were exhibiting signs of the neurological degeneration associated with mercury poisoning.

    November 06, 2009

    Amnesty International’s Brief in support of Bill C-300

    An Act respecting Corporate Accountability for the Activities of Mining, Oil or Gas in Developing Countries

    Presented to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development

    6 November 2009

    Amnesty strongly supports the important purpose of Bill C-300 -  ensuring “that corporations engaged in mining, oil or gas activities and receiving support from the Government of Canada act in a manner consistent with international environmental best practices and with Canada’s commitments to international human rights standards.” Amnesty ultimately believes not only that human rights can be good for business, but also that business can be good for human rights. For these reasons, Amnesty strongly supports Bill C-300 and urges all Members of Parliament to vote in favour of this important legislation.

    There is not one cause of violence against Indigenous women and girls, and likewise, there is not one single solution. A comprehensive, coordinated, well resourced national response, developed with Indigenous women and girls, is needed to end the violence. 

    What solutions are needed to stop the violence?

    A comprehensive national response to end violence against Indigenous women and girls should include:

    A national public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women focused on exposing the nature of this violence and on ensuring government and police accountability for an effective and coordinated response.

    A national action plan to end violence against women which addresses the root causes of violence and identifies holistic, culturally-appropriate ways in which to prevent violence and to support those impacted by violence.

    The Paddle for the Peace is held annually to celebrate and recognize the need to protect the Valley and retain its critical ecosystem values in the face of the threat of the Site C dam.

    The Paddle is a day long event that begins on the Peace River, at the Halfway River Bridge on Highway 29, approximately a half hour drive from Fort St. John.

    You will start the day with a full, hearty breakfast, sponsored by the West Moberly First Nations at the launch site between 9 and 11 a.m. Following breakfast, keynote speakers and dignitaries will address the need to protect this precious valley.  The canoes and safety boats will launch at noon. You will enjoy a leisurely 1.5 hour paddle or cruise through this incredibly scenic river valley alongside hundreds of others who care deeply for it. The paddle culminates at Bear Flat and will be followed by a BBQ lunch hosted by the Prophet River First Nations, keynote speakers, musical entertainment as well as the opportunity to visit with other event participants.

     

    Return to Out of Sight, Out of Mind home page

     

    For French and Spanish graphics please send us an email 

    For the third year in a row Amnesty International in Toronto partners with One Fire Movement during Pedestrian Sundays in Kensington Market. 

    The focus will be on corporate accountability and the Democractic Republic of Congo, drawing on Amnesty International's Report on cobalt mining.

    If you would like to volunteer for the day contact the  AI Toronto Business and Human Rights Indigenous Team: bhr@aito.ca

    Please come and join us for a lively discussion of our book choice, human rights, and how you can make a difference. 

    We're reading Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson

    Bring a friend, all welcome!

    Amnesty International is in the process of conducting research into the human rights impacts of large-scale natural resource development in northeastern British Columbia, with a particular focus on the region’s urban centre, Fort St. John. Part of this research focuses on the human rights impacts on women and girls, and particularly Indigenous women and girls.

    Why? Because every year women from Fort St. John travel to Ottawa with a banner listing the missing and murdered women and girls in their community—and every year the banner includes more names. And because, as a wide range of people and organizations from this region have pointed out, environmental assessments and other decision-making processes around large-scale natural resource development projects need to pay more attention to their impact on people's lives and the social fabric of the communities they live in.

    << Back to campaign homepage

     

    &amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;p&amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;

    Ai Wei Wei: Never Sorry, and Umoja: No Men Allowed.

    On October 16, Amnesty supporters will be running/walking in the Toronto Waterfront event to raise money for our essential human rights work. You can participate in three ways:

    1.  Support one or more of the runners with a donation. Watch this space in September for a list of runners and their fundraising pages.

    2.  Choose to run the marathon, or to run/walk the half marathon (21km) or the 5km yourself.

    3.  Recruit a runner to participate in your place and help them fundraise.

    Just so you know, the course is pretty flat, you can rest any time, medics are available to help you with blisters or cramps, and best of all, you will be jogging beside Lake Ontario with 22,000 people from all over the world! One more tip: Most runners find running on the day of the event easier than when they are training solo. To sign up with a “yes” or a “maybe”, contact Marilyn McKim at mmckim@amnesty.ca  for instructions on registering and fundraising.

        

    Over and over again, throughout the year, Amnesty activists stood up for human rights. Whether in campaigns that took place in schools, film festivals and music concerts, whether in small or in large places, we demanded human rights change. We took action sometimes alone, sometimes with partner organizations, and more and more frequently with the very people and communities whose rights are on the line. We were active in letter writing, internet petitions, social and traditional media, and in many other ways.

    We have done so much important human rights work together this year, and we’ve done it well. And having done all this work, we are prepared to do it all over again, and again, until  we see the change that is required.

    Aung San Suu Kyi has repeatedly told the Amnesty members who campaigned for her freedom that, just as we didn’t give up our work for her, we must not give up on our work for the many others whose freedom has been taken away. 

    Violence against Indigenous women and girls isn't just an Indigenous issue or a women's issue. It is a Canadian issue and to end the violence each one of us must commit to taking action in our daily lives. What can you do?

    Implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Priorities, Partnerships, and Next Steps

    21 November. 2017

    Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau

    9:00 – 17:00

    Free admission / Entrée gratuite

    Lunch provided / Repas compris

    Optional donation / Don facultative

     

    Webcast / Webdiffusion: livestream.com/uqo

    Facebook: goo.gl/eKtHpz

    Eventbrite: goo.gl/byNYZ5

    Coalition for the Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples /

    Coalition canadienne pour les droits des peuples autochtones: chrip.ca

     

    Opening Reception (in person only, not webcast)

    20 November 2017

    Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau

     

    18:30 – 21:00

    The Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould

    Pages

    Subscribe to Canada
    rights