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    Clare Bayley’s provocative depiction of migrant smuggling won the Amnesty International Freedom of Expression Award for its unflinching and empathetic portrayal of the very human stories behind the statistics. 

    When the doors of the container shut behind you, let your eyes adjust as you meet five complex individuals: Fatima, Asha, Jemal, Ahmad and Mariam. You join them on the final leg of their voyage, as they are smuggled across Europe in the confined space of a shipping container. The only thing they have in common is their goal: to get to England and start a new life. Witness them torn between greed and generosity, watched over by the mysterious Agent who orchestrates their journey. With freedom so close, what price would you pay?

    Show runs from September 4-18, Thursday and Fridays at 6 & 9PM, Saturdays and Sundays at 3 & 6PM.

    What are your ideas for activism and public engagement? Are you a long-time supporter of Amnesty International, or new to our campaigns and actions? Maybe you’ve joined an Amnesty group at your school or in your community, organized a letter-writing event, raised money for Amnesty, or signed online actions.

    However you’ve been involved, this is your invitation to join with other activists and participate in a lively conversation focused on fostering human rights activism and organizing others.

    We’re looking for new and innovative ideas and plans that we can support and share with others across the country.

    Prior to each Roundtable we’ll provide a brief description of current and upcoming campaigns and the objectives and targets that go with them, and propose an agenda designed to open up discussion and encourage participants to bring forward their ideas for activism, creative actions, and public engagement.

    For more details please contact Elena Dumitru edumitru@amnesty.ca

    A report released by the RCMP earlier this year marks the first time that police in Canada have attempted, at the national level, to identify how many First Nations, Inuit or Métis women and girls have been murdered or have gone missing.

    According to the report, 1,017 women and girls identified as Indigenous were murdered between 1980 and 2012—a homicide rate roughly 4.5 times higher than that of all other women in Canada.

    In addition, the report states that as of November 2013, at least 105 Indigenous women and girls remained missing under suspicious circumstances or for undetermined reasons.

    These appalling statistics are consistent with previous estimates from sources such as Statistics Canada that have long pointed to a greatly disproportionate level of violence against that First Nations, Inuit and Métis women and girls. The latest numbers also underline what Indigenous women and advocacy organizations have long been saying–that this violence requires a specific and concerted response from police and all levels of society.

    Group 82 Amnesty International presents A Sisters in Spirit Vigil - honouring missing and murdered indigenous women, girls and two-spirit people.  Wednesday, October 4, 2017 from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. at the Cedar Grove Labyrinth behind the new BVO location in Thornbury.  A short program will be followed by a walk on the labyrinth.  Together we can make a difference!



     

    All governments have a responsibility to do everything in their power to prevent violence against women. This includes provincial and territorial governments as well as municipalities. It also includes Indigenous governments and institutions such as Band Councils. All have a shared responsibility to be part of the solution to ending violence against Indigenous women and girls.

    However, the federal government has a particular responsibility to help ensure the safety and well-being of Indigenous women and girls.

    Here are some of the reasons why:

    We're excited to announce that registration is now open for the 2016 Amnesty Youth Activist Conference in Saskatchewan. The goals of the Conference are to connect young activists and those interested in getting involved in human rights activism for a day of inspiration and learning!

    The Amnesty Youth Conference will take place in Saskatoon on Saturday, October 15 and in Regina on Sunday, October 16.

    The agenda will include: a panel discussion featuring experienced activists, Amnesty 101 (an introduction to Amnesty International), and a session on how to be a successful activist and what's next (using your activism skills after the conference). As well, we will hold workshops on Amnesty International's Cobalt campaign, refugee rights, Indigenous rights, and supporting human rights defenders in the Americas.

    The morning will start with yoga (optional) and registration at 9 am, with the program officially beginning at 9:45 am. The Conference will finish at 4:30 pm.

    Gender, Indigenous rights, and energy development in northeast British Columbia, Canada

    Join Amnesty International's new campaign to make sure the safety and wellness of Indigenous women and girls in northeast BC, Canada, an area with massive hydroelectric, oil, gas, and coal projects, is not #OutofSightOutofMind! 

     

    It’s a crucial moment for human rights in Canada. And you can be part of it.

    From October 20-24, the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal will hear the closing arguments in a history-making case on equity for First Nations children.

    At issue is whether the federal government has discriminated against First Nations children living on reserves, and in the Yukon, by consistently providing less money per child for family services than its provincial counterparts provide in predominantly non-Aboriginal communities.

    At stake is the ability of children’s agencies to provide urgently needed prevention programs for at risk First Nations children and to stem the unprecedented numbers of First Nations children being taken from their families and communities and put into state care.

    The human rights complaint was initiated by a national non-governmental organization, the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society. Cindy Blackstock, Executive Director of the Caring Society, recently told Amnesty International,

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      Canada needs to be "Open for Justice" and not just "Open for Business"

    Human rights abuses at Canadian-owned mining and oil and gas sites around the world are widespread and well documented. Victims often have nowhere to turn to seek justice. To fix this problem, Amnesty International urges Canada to be “Open for Justice”.

    Canada has been viewed as a global leader with respect to refugee protection.  It has signed the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees other human rights instruments which protect refugees.  Canada was the first country to set out guidelines for considering the refugee claims of women, and has taken an active role globally in the resettlement of refugees through both government and private sponsorship programs.  In recent years however, Canada like many other countries, is creating more barriers for people seeking safety and security.

    Amnesty International is concerned that the debate around asylum seekers and refugees in Canada is being framed by myths and misconceptions. Government ministers frequently refer to asylum seekers and refugees as ‘bogus’ and attempt to shape public attitudes with language which suggests refugees are criminals or otherwise “breaking the rules.”

    Amnesty International Submission to the UN Universal Periodic Review, April-May 2013

    In this submission, prepared for the UN Universal Periodic Review of Canada in April-May 2013, Amnesty International comments on Canada’s implementation of its human rights obligations and on its engagement with UPR principles, such as consultation with civil society. 

    Amnesty International notes Canada’s reluctance to ratify international human rights conventions or to adopt binding international standards on corporate accountability.

    The organization also comments on the human rights situation facing Indigenous Peoples, the rising inequality of women and troubling trends regarding sexual violence against women, arbitrary detention and refoulement of migrants, as well as concerns regarding torture, and excessive methods of policing during protests.

    Your Member of Parliament needs to know that constituents like you are calling for a comprehensive national response to the alarmingly high rates of violence against Indigenous women. 

    Phone or meet with your Member of Parliament (MP) during the week of October 14-17, when MPs are home for the Thanksgiving break week, to express concern about the scale of the violence and to call for a National Action Plan on violence against Indigenous women coupled with a National Public Inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.

    Who is your MP?

    Find out here.

    The Paddle for the Peace is held annually to celebrate and recognize the need to protect the Valley and retain its critical ecosystem values in the face of the threat of the Site C dam.

    The Paddle is a day long event that begins on the Peace River, at the Halfway River Bridge on Highway 29, approximately a half hour drive from Fort St. John.

    You will start the day with a full, hearty breakfast, sponsored by the West Moberly First Nations at the launch site between 9 and 11 a.m. Following breakfast, keynote speakers and dignitaries will address the need to protect this precious valley.  The canoes and safety boats will launch at noon. You will enjoy a leisurely 1.5 hour paddle or cruise through this incredibly scenic river valley alongside hundreds of others who care deeply for it. The paddle culminates at Bear Flat and will be followed by a BBQ lunch hosted by the Prophet River First Nations, keynote speakers, musical entertainment as well as the opportunity to visit with other event participants.

     

    Return to Out of Sight, Out of Mind home page

     

    For French and Spanish graphics please send us an email 

    For the third year in a row Amnesty International in Toronto partners with One Fire Movement during Pedestrian Sundays in Kensington Market. 

    The focus will be on corporate accountability and the Democractic Republic of Congo, drawing on Amnesty International's Report on cobalt mining.

    If you would like to volunteer for the day contact the  AI Toronto Business and Human Rights Indigenous Team: bhr@aito.ca

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