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    We share our world, and we share responsibility for making it the kind of place in which we want to live. This includes responsibility for protecting each other’s human rights and freedom.

    Amnesty International Submission to the UN Universal Periodic Review, April-May 2013

    In this submission, prepared for the UN Universal Periodic Review of Canada in April-May 2013, Amnesty International comments on Canada’s implementation of its human rights obligations and on its engagement with UPR principles, such as consultation with civil society. 

    Amnesty International notes Canada’s reluctance to ratify international human rights conventions or to adopt binding international standards on corporate accountability.

    The organization also comments on the human rights situation facing Indigenous Peoples, the rising inequality of women and troubling trends regarding sexual violence against women, arbitrary detention and refoulement of migrants, as well as concerns regarding torture, and excessive methods of policing during protests.

    Your Member of Parliament needs to know that constituents like you are calling for a comprehensive national response to the alarmingly high rates of violence against Indigenous women. 

    Phone or meet with your Member of Parliament (MP) during the week of October 14-17, when MPs are home for the Thanksgiving break week, to express concern about the scale of the violence and to call for a National Action Plan on violence against Indigenous women coupled with a National Public Inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.

    Who is your MP?

    Find out here.

    Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Un Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Calls to Action & Imperatives for Change.

    Panelists: Doug White, jennifer Preston, Paul Joffe, Craig Benjamin.

     

    Contact: douglas.white@viu.ca

     

    Photo: Demonstrators participate in peaceful protest on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, 21 December 2012. Susanne Ure/ Amnesty International

    Do you live in the Vancouver Lower Mainland? If so, join us for a free webinar on March 17 at 7 PM.

    Register now!

    We have all heard deeply disturbing reports about Canadian mining companies involved in human rights violations around the world, including in Africa, Latin America and Asia.

    Join this webinar to find out what you can do to help hold Canadian mining companies accountable for harming people in other countries, and to make sure that people who have been harmed by Canadian companies are able to seek justice in Canada.

    This webinar is for residents of the Vancouver Lower Mainland who are interested in human rights and mining justice. We will bring together people from different political ridings to strategize about lobbying their Member of Parliament (MP).

    Special guest: a local MP will join us and talk about how easy and effective it is to talk to your Member of Parliament about issues you are concerned about.

    Hi-Ho Mistahey! by Alanis Obomsawin, National Film Board of Canada

    Hi-Ho Mistahey, a powerful new documentary by acclaimed filmmaker Alanis Obomsawim, tells the story of Shannen's Dream, a grassroots youth movement standing up for First Nations children and their right to equitable access to schools and education.

    Until February 16, you can click on the link above to view Hi-Ho Mistahey!  online. This special streaming presentation of the documentary is in collaboration with Have a Heart Day. Have a Heart Day is a national campaign, initiated by the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society to promote the rights of First Nations children.

    More information on Have a Heart Day

    The scale and severity of violence faced by Indigenous women and girls requires a corresponding commitment by government to ensuring their safety. Amnesty International has long called for a comprehensive, coordinated national plan of action to address gaps in current policies, programs and services; involve Indigenous women’s organizations in identifying the necessary solutions; and ensure accountability in their delivery.

    On September 12, the Federal Court of Appeal in Montreal will hear the latest legal challenge to the massive Site C hydroelectric dam already under construction on Treaty 8 territory in northeast British Columbia.

    First Nations community members from Treaty 8 are travelling by bus across Canada to focus attention of the importance of this case to the rights of all treaty nations and to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s promised new relationship with First Nations.

    On September 13, the caravan will arrive in Ottawa to mark the anniversary of the adoption by the United Nations of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples with a rally on Parliament Hill. 

    Please come and join us for a lively discussion of our book choice, human rights, and how you can make a difference. 

    We're reading Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson

    Bring a friend, all welcome!

    Implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Priorities, Partnerships, and Next Steps

    21 November. 2017

    Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau

    9:00 – 17:00

    Free admission / Entrée gratuite

    Lunch provided / Repas compris

    Optional donation / Don facultative

     

    Webcast / Webdiffusion: livestream.com/uqo

    Facebook: goo.gl/eKtHpz

    Eventbrite: goo.gl/byNYZ5

    Coalition for the Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples /

    Coalition canadienne pour les droits des peuples autochtones: chrip.ca

     

    Opening Reception (in person only, not webcast)

    20 November 2017

    Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau

     

    18:30 – 21:00

    The Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould

    Join us for this conversation between Thomas King and Craig Benjamin. If you are not on the Amnesty Book Club Newsletter, you are encouraged to sign up and not miss the event. Sign up for the newsletter at AmnestyBookClub.ca. The event will revolve around Mr. King's 2015 Amnesty Book Club Reader's Choice Selection, The Inconvenient Indian. All are welcome and you do not need to have read the book to enjoy the conversation! If you have questions for Mr. King, the Book Club, or about this event in general, please send an email to bookclub@amnesty.ca

    Don't miss The Inconvenient Indian discussion guide for more insights into the book, and Amnesty's work with Indigenous Peoples. 

    On September 12, the Federal Court of Appeal in Montreal will hear the latest legal challenge to the massive Site C hydroelectric dam already under construction on Treaty 8 territory in northeast British Columbia.

    First Nations community members from Treaty 8 are travelling by bus across Canada to focus attention of the importance of this case to the rights of all treaty nations and to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s promised new relationship with First Nations.

    Members of West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations will join with allies outside the courthouse to show support for this historic case. 

    On September 12, the Federal Court of Appeal in Montreal will hear the latest legal challenge to the massive Site C hydroelectric dam already under construction on Treaty 8 territory in northeast British Columbia.

    First Nations community members from Treaty 8 are setting out today to travel by bus across Canada to focus attention of the importance of this case to the rights of all treaty nations and to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s promised new relationship with First Nations.

    After a rally on Parliament Hill in the morning, members of West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations will join with allies to celebrate a community feast in Ottawa. 

    On Friday, February 26th, at 7:30 p.m. in Room B-112 of Okanagan College, 1000 KLO Road, Amnesty International's Kelowna group presents "Highway of Tears"- a documentary film about the disappearances of at least 40 young women, mostly aboriginal, since the 1960s on Highway 16 in northern B.C.  A recent RCMP special investigation linked DNA from one of the missing women to a deceased American criminal.  The cases reveal sweeping crimes: kidnapping, rape, torture, murder and the disposal of human bodies.  The women have been victims not only of murderous predators but also of a pervasive systemic racism that has kept them marginalized on impoverished reservations.  First Nations leaders and activists contend that there has been little interest in further investigating the crimes and in apprehending their killers.  Admission is by donation.  More information at 250-769-4740.

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