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    February 22, 2018
    Amnesty International publishes State of the World’s Human Rights report for 2017 to 2018 “Last year our world was immersed in crises, with prominent leaders offering us a nightmarish vision of a society blinded by hatred and fear. This emboldened those who promote bigotry, but it inspired far more people to campaign for a more hopeful future,” says Salil Shetty, head of Amnesty International

    The world is reaping the terrifying consequences of hate-filled rhetoric that threatens to normalize massive discrimination against marginalized groups, Amnesty International warned today as it launched its annual assessment of human rights.

    Nevertheless, the organization found that a growing movement of both first-time and seasoned activists campaigning for social justice provides real hope of reversing the slide towards oppression.

    The report, The State of the World’s Human Rights, covers 159 countries and delivers the most comprehensive analysis of the state of human rights in the world today.

    August 17, 2017
      For several hours yesterday, Nicaraguan police officers prevented communities from participating in a peaceful march against the construction of the Interoceanic Grand Canal in Nicaragua.   The march, organised by the National Council in Defence of our Land, Lake and Sovereignty, was the 91st protest against the project which will affect thousands of people. The renowned human rights defender Bianca Jagger also participated in the massive demonstration.   The police temporarily stopped the protestors from arriving in buses to the starting point for the march taking place in La Fonseca, approximately 300km from the Nicaraguan capital.   “Once again, the Nicaraguan police have violated people’s right to peaceful protest. These kinds of actions are, quite simply, acts of intimidation designed to suppress any expression of disagreement with the policies of Daniel Ortega’s government,” said Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas Director at Amnesty International.  
    August 03, 2017

    The Nicaraguan government must stop placing business before the future of the country and its people, Amnesty International said in a new report today looking at a secretive deal that will lead to the construction of a canal and other side projects that will affect the livelihoods of tens of thousands of people and might leave many homeless.

    Danger: Rights for sale. The Interoceanic Grand Canal project in Nicaragua and the erosion of human rights reveals how the obscure legal framework that led to the concession of the project, without genuine consultation with all affected communities, violates a catalogue of national and international standards on human rights and might lead to the forced eviction of hundreds of families. It also accuses authorities of harassing and persecuting anyone who dares to voice an opinion against the deal.

    “Authorities in Nicaragua have secretly sold the country’s future to the highest bidder and put thousands of people at risk of losing everything,” said Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas Director at Amnesty International.

    September 26, 2013

    Women may have to face their abusers in mediation after a legal reform passed by Nicaragua’s National Assembly last night, a move Amnesty International said is letting down thousands of survivors of domestic violence across the country.

    “Instead of focusing on mediation and ways of letting abusers off the hook, the Nicaraguan authorities should look at ways of protecting women from violence and ensuring that those who abuse them face justice,” said Esther Major, Nicaragua researcher at Amnesty International who recently returned from the country

    The Law 779 (Ley Integral contra la Violencia hacia la Mujer, Integral Law against Violence against Women), passed in 2012, provides a route for women to access justice and protection from violence and to hold perpetrators to account.

    Amnesty International is currently analysing the reforms to the law in full.

    For more information, please contact Elizabeth Berton-Hunter, Media Relations, 416-363-9933 ext 332


    May 03, 2013

    The Nicaraguan authorities should support a landmark law that defines crimes of violence against women and guarantee its full implementation, Amnesty International said today.

    Law 779 (Ley Integral contra la Violencia hacia la Mujer, Integral Law against Violence against Women) provides a route for women to access justice and protection from violence and to hold perpetrators to account.

    However, since it was passed last year the law has been consistently threatened by opponents who assert it is anti-family and anti-men, and that it is responsible for breaking up families.

    “The violence perpetrated against women and children is what breaks up families, not legislation designed to help victims escape from violence and hold abusers to account,” said Esther Major, Amnesty International’s Researcher on Nicaragua.

    “If the Nicaraguan authorities are serious about preventing violence from breaking up families, then Law 779 should be fully supported, resourced and implemented. Attempts to undermine the implementation of this law must be stopped.”

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