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Raif Badawi

    Raif Badawi's wife Ensaf Haidar attends Amnistie Internationale Canada Francophone Vigil for Raif in Montreal
    Raif Badawi's wife Ensaf Haidar attends Amnistie Internationale Canada Francophone Vigil for Raif in Montreal
    Vigil for Raif in Montreal
    Vigil for Raif in Montreal
    Protest for Raif in Belgium
    Vigil for Raif in Denmark
    Protest for Raif in France
    Protest for Raif in Berlin, Germany
    Protest for Raif in Italy
    Vigil for Raif outside the Saudi Arabia Embassy in the United Kingdom
    Protest for Raif in the Netherlands
    Protest for Raif in the Netherlands
    Alex Neve, Amnesty Canada's Secretary General, with torture survivor Naser al-Raas. Together at Saudi Embassy protest today for Raif Badawi
    Protest outside the Saudi Arabia Embassy in Ottawa, Canada
    Protest outside the Saudi Arabia Embassy in Ottawa, Canada
    Protest outside the Saudi Arabia Embassy in Ottawa, Canada
    Protest outside the Saudi Arabia Embassy in Ottawa, Canada
    Protest for Raif in Poland
    Protest for Raif in Finland
    Protest for Raif in Finland
    Raif Badawi is sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes for setting up a website in Saudi Arabia.
    Over 1 million people worldwide have been part of a phenomenal groundswell of action. The photos above display how embassies around the world have been bombarded with urgent pleas to release Raif, and Amnesty International activists have spread the word on the internet and taken the message to the streets in Ottawa, Montreal, Oslo, London, Rome ... 
    Sign and share our petition now 

    UPDATE:  On June 7, the Saudi Arabian Supreme Court upheld the sentence against Raif.  Raif Badawi is still at risk of further flogging for as long as his sentence remains, so please do keep up your great work  - more than 175,000 Canadians have spoken up on written and online Amnesty petitions!

    The Saudi Arabian authorities have not yet made an official statement on the case despite the international outcry, including a forceful statement in the European Parliament. Amnesty supporters continue to hold protests in front of the Saudi embassy in Ottawa to urge Raif's release. 

    Raif's wife, Ensaf Haidar, says thank you to Amnesty supporters. Watch video message.

    Global petition counter

     

     

    FREE BLOGGER RAIF BADAWI

    - Sentenced to receive 50 lashes every Friday

    Raif Badawi was sentenced in Saudi Arabia to 10 years in jail and 1,000 lashes after starting a website for social and political debate – demand his release today.

     

    WHAT YOU CAN DO


     

      Ensaf, who lives with her children in Canada, holds picture of her husband
     
     
       

    1. Share Amnesty's petition

    Share a link to Amnesty's petition: www.amnesty.ca/badawi

    On Twitter you can use the hashtags #FreeRaif  #RaifBadawi and #StopTorture.

    Here is a suggested tweet: #SaudiArabia: Freedom not flogging for #RaifBadawi. Add your voice to #StopTorture & #FreeRaif. www.amnesty.ca/badawi

     

    2. Call the Saudi Embassy 

    Call the Embassy for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in Ottawa and leave a message asking for Raif Badawi to be freed and for the sentence of flogging not to be carried out.

    The Embassy’s hours are 9am-4pm. The number is: 613-237-4100 (if that line is busy you can try 4101, 4102 or 4103).

    Here’s is a suggested approach for you to use:

    May I speak with the ambassador, His Excellency Naif Bin Bandir Alsudairy please? (If they do not connect you, ask to leave a message)

    I am calling to talk about Raif Badawi. He is serving a ten year prison sentence for his blogging activities in Saudi Arabia. Raif Badawi is a prisoner of conscience detained solely for peacefully exercising his right to freedom of expression.

    I urge his Majesty the King to:
    • Release Raif Badawi immediately and unconditionally.
    • Ensure that his conviction and sentence are cancelled.
    • Not carry out any further punishment of flogging, as this would violate the prohibition on torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment under international law.

    Thank you for listening. Can you please convey this message to the King?
     

     

    3. Speak up in solidarity - tell Raif he is not forgotten

    Tweet @raif_badawi and his wife Ensaf Haidar will pass it on. Suggested tweet:

    .@raif_badawi you are not forgotten #FreeRaif #Istandwithraif #Saudi

    You can also send a message to Raif's wife, Ensaf Haidar.

    Ensaf Haidar
    c/o Amnistie Internationale Canada Francophone
    50 Rue Ste-Catherine Ouest, Bureau 500
    Montréal, Québec, H2X 3V4
    Canada

     

    4. Mail or fax a letter to Saudi officials

    Send your message to

    His Royal Highness Prince Mohammed bin Naif bin Abdul Aziz Al Saud
    Ministry of the Interior
    P.O. Box 2933, Airport Road
    Riyadh 11134, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Postage: $2.50
    Fax:   011 966 11 403 3125 (hard to reach)

    Please send copies to

    His Excellency Naif Bandir A. Alsudairy
    Ambassador for Saudi Arabia
    201 Sussex Drive
    Ottawa, Ontario K1N 1K6

    Postage: $.85
    Telephone:  (613) 237-4100
    Fax:   (613) 237-0567
    Email:  caemb@mofa.gov.sa
    Via website: http://embassies.mofa.gov.sa/sites/canada/EN/Ambassador/Pages/Contact.aspx

     

    5. Write a letter to help free Raif's lawyer Waleed Abu al-Khair

    Waleed Abu al-Khair, a human rights defender and lawyer for imprisoned blogger Raif Badawi, is currently serving a 15 year sentence in addition to a fine of 200,000 Saudi Arabian riyals (approximately $67,000 CAD) and a 15-year travel ban. Amnesty International considers him a prisoner of conscience detained solely for his peaceful human rights work.

    In 2008, Waleed Abu al-Khair founded  the Monitor of Human Rights in Saudi Arabia, one of the few local NGOs documenting human rights violations in the country.  In addition to Raif Badawi, Waleed Abu al-Khair has represented many victims of human rights violations, despite being told by the government to stop representing specific defendants, namely activists and reformists.

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