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North Korea

    April 27, 2018
    North Korean Cheerleaders dressed in matching red outfits at the 2018 Olympics

    K-pop band Red Velvet performed to a packed theatre in Pyongyang with Kim Jong-un’s attendance earlier this month - they are the first South Korean singers to perform in North Korea in more than a decade. This is just one of a string of surprising moves North Korea has made recently, the most notable being a possible summit with Jong-un’s sparring partner Donald Trump. This thaw in relations might seem promising, but it is too early to tell if this is a permanent shift in policy or a fleeting moment.


    South Korean K-pop band Red Velvet perform in Pyongyang

    March 19, 2014
    By Salil Shetty, Special to CNN Original published for CNN

    The resounding victory for Kim Jong  Un in North Korea’s parliamentary elections this past week reflects the  “absolute support” of people in the country, according to state media.

    However, it’s doubtful such support includes the  hundreds of thousands of people – including children – that languish in  political prison camps and other detention facilities. Or those that have been the victims of  crimes against humanity as documented in a chilling U.N. report made  public last month.  Indeed, the  U.N. Commission of Inquiry report was unprecedented, stating: “The  gravity, scale and nature of these violations…does not have any parallel  in the contemporary world.”

    When  the full horror of the atrocities committed by North Korea against its own citizens was laid bare, support for the  Commission’s comprehensive findings was swift among many in the  international community. But such statements of support will not bring  to an end the systematic torture, executions,  rape, or forced labor inflicted upon North Koreans by their own  government. Nor will it ensure those responsible for these crimes  against humanity are brought to justice.

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