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Bolivia

    February 22, 2018
    Amnesty International publishes State of the World’s Human Rights report for 2017 to 2018 “Last year our world was immersed in crises, with prominent leaders offering us a nightmarish vision of a society blinded by hatred and fear. This emboldened those who promote bigotry, but it inspired far more people to campaign for a more hopeful future,” says Salil Shetty, head of Amnesty International

    The world is reaping the terrifying consequences of hate-filled rhetoric that threatens to normalize massive discrimination against marginalized groups, Amnesty International warned today as it launched its annual assessment of human rights.

    Nevertheless, the organization found that a growing movement of both first-time and seasoned activists campaigning for social justice provides real hope of reversing the slide towards oppression.

    The report, The State of the World’s Human Rights, covers 159 countries and delivers the most comprehensive analysis of the state of human rights in the world today.

    April 28, 2017

    The civil society organization Bolivian Documentation and Information Centre (CEDIB) reports being harassed, threatened, and evicted from its premises in Cochabamba, central Bolivia. This is a worrying sign of shrinking civic space in Bolivia and could mean the loss of decades of evidence related to human rights in the country.

    On 21 March, the Dean of Universidad Mayor de San Simon (UMSS), a public university in Cochabamba, Juan Rios, issued an official letter to the Director of the Bolivian Documentation and Information Centre (Centro de Documentación e Información Bolivia, CEDIB), Marco Gandarillas, informing CEDIB that they had 48 hours to vacate their office, located inside the UMSS, which they have occupied since 1993. This letter was sent following a visit on the same day by a UMSS advisor to the CEDIB office. CEDIB staff members reported that during this visit the UMSS advisor threatened the CEDIB staff, stating that they would be “locked in” and “they would not be allowed in or out of their office” if they did not evacuate the premises immediately.

    July 10, 2015

    The Bolivian authorities must take decisive action to tackle discrimination and other barriers women and girls face when trying to exercise their sexual and reproductive rights, said Amnesty International as the country is up for scrutiny by the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women on 14 July.

    A new Amnesty International briefing to the UN Committee evaluates the situation and gives a series of recommendations to the Bolivian authorities.

    “Bolivia has made great progress on protecting women’s rights in the past 10 years, including passing new laws to guarantee gender equality and to protect women from violence. But there’s still a very long way to go to live up to these commitments, and the lack of effective action and financial investment means that women and girls, particularly indigenous women and those living in poverty, are still suffering abuse,” said Fernanda Doz Costa, Americas Researcher at Amnesty International who will be in Geneva for the session, and has been conducting research on the issue.

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