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    What would resource extraction and development look like if the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was implemented in Canada? This panel attempts to answer that question. We'll hear from Indigenous rights advocates and legal experts about what UNDRIP is, how it has been contravened by projects like the Site C dam in BC and the Alton Gas project in Nova Scotia, and processes developed by Indigenous communities to give, or withhold, consent. Panelists will discuss the topic in broad terms as well as offer specific insights to ongoing projects and resistance movements. This event is co-sponsored by the Council of Canadians and Halifax Public Libraries. 

    Children in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) inhale toxic dust as they mine the cobalt that powers the batteries we rely on for our phones, tablets and laptops. Yet global electronics manufacturers won’t tell us if their cobalt supply chains are tainted by child labour. They have a responsibility to do so –to check for and address child labour in their supply chains, setting an example for the rest of the industry to follow. Electric vehicle companies also need to ensure that their car batteries do not contain cobalt mined by children.

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    Clare Bayley’s provocative depiction of migrant smuggling won the Amnesty International Freedom of Expression Award for its unflinching and empathetic portrayal of the very human stories behind the statistics. 

    When the doors of the container shut behind you, let your eyes adjust as you meet five complex individuals: Fatima, Asha, Jemal, Ahmad and Mariam. You join them on the final leg of their voyage, as they are smuggled across Europe in the confined space of a shipping container. The only thing they have in common is their goal: to get to England and start a new life. Witness them torn between greed and generosity, watched over by the mysterious Agent who orchestrates their journey. With freedom so close, what price would you pay?

    Show runs from September 4-18, Thursday and Fridays at 6 & 9PM, Saturdays and Sundays at 3 & 6PM.

    Join us for this conversation between Thomas King and Craig Benjamin. If you are not on the Amnesty Book Club Newsletter, you are encouraged to sign up and not miss the event. Sign up for the newsletter at AmnestyBookClub.ca. The event will revolve around Mr. King's 2015 Amnesty Book Club Reader's Choice Selection, The Inconvenient Indian. All are welcome and you do not need to have read the book to enjoy the conversation! If you have questions for Mr. King, the Book Club, or about this event in general, please send an email to bookclub@amnesty.ca

    Don't miss The Inconvenient Indian discussion guide for more insights into the book, and Amnesty's work with Indigenous Peoples. 

    Join us on Parliament Hill for the 6th Annual Families of Sisters in Spirit Vigil to honour the memory of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. 

    Details about other events and vigils in Ottawa on October 4th will be posted as more information becomes available. 

    On Friday, February 26th, at 7:30 p.m. in Room B-112 of Okanagan College, 1000 KLO Road, Amnesty International's Kelowna group presents "Highway of Tears"- a documentary film about the disappearances of at least 40 young women, mostly aboriginal, since the 1960s on Highway 16 in northern B.C.  A recent RCMP special investigation linked DNA from one of the missing women to a deceased American criminal.  The cases reveal sweeping crimes: kidnapping, rape, torture, murder and the disposal of human bodies.  The women have been victims not only of murderous predators but also of a pervasive systemic racism that has kept them marginalized on impoverished reservations.  First Nations leaders and activists contend that there has been little interest in further investigating the crimes and in apprehending their killers.  Admission is by donation.  More information at 250-769-4740.

    Let the Indigenous peoples of the Peace River valley know that you stand with them in their fight against the Site C dam

    Join our global campaigning on Site C by sending a solidarity message or photograph of yourself to show you support their struggle to protect their ancestral lands.

    Add your photo or message to this page by posting on twitter or instagram using the hashtag #withthePeaceRiver.

    We're excited to announce that registration is now open for the 2016 Amnesty Youth Activist Conference in Saskatchewan. The goals of the Conference are to connect young activists and those interested in getting involved in human rights activism for a day of inspiration and learning!

    The Amnesty Youth Conference will take place in Saskatoon on Saturday, October 15 and in Regina on Sunday, October 16.

    The agenda will include: a panel discussion featuring experienced activists, Amnesty 101 (an introduction to Amnesty International), and a session on how to be a successful activist and what's next (using your activism skills after the conference). As well, we will hold workshops on Amnesty International's Cobalt campaign, refugee rights, Indigenous rights, and supporting human rights defenders in the Americas.

    The morning will start with yoga (optional) and registration at 9 am, with the program officially beginning at 9:45 am. The Conference will finish at 4:30 pm.

    Please come and join us for a lively discussion of our book choice, human rights, and how you can make a difference. 

    We're reading Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson

    Bring a friend, all welcome!

    What are your ideas for activism and public engagement? Are you a long-time supporter of Amnesty International, or new to our campaigns and actions? Maybe you’ve joined an Amnesty group at your school or in your community, organized a letter-writing event, raised money for Amnesty, or signed online actions.

    However you’ve been involved, this is your invitation to join with other activists and participate in a lively conversation focused on fostering human rights activism and organizing others.

    We’re looking for new and innovative ideas and plans that we can support and share with others across the country.

    Prior to each Roundtable we’ll provide a brief description of current and upcoming campaigns and the objectives and targets that go with them, and propose an agenda designed to open up discussion and encourage participants to bring forward their ideas for activism, creative actions, and public engagement.

    For more details please contact Elena Dumitru edumitru@amnesty.ca

     

    Return to Out of Sight, Out of Mind home page

     

    For French and Spanish graphics please send us an email 

    By Jackie Hansen, Major Campaigns and Women’s Rights Campaigner, Amnesty International Canada

    On Tuesday morning Bridget Tolley did what no mother wants to do—search for her missing daughter. Laura Spence and her friend Nicole Whiteduck were last seen on Sunday morning in Kitigan Zibi, a community north of Ottawa.

    Tolley is the co-founder of the grassroots organization Families of Sisters in Spirit—one of Amnesty International’s key partners in the Stolen Sisters campaign to end violence against Indigenous women in Canada. She provides support to Indigenous families across Canada whose daughters, sisters, mothers, and aunties have gone missing or been murdered. And while she understands very well the pain of losing a loved one—her mother was killed in 2001 by a police cruiser—until this week she had not experienced what many of the families she works with have gone through when a loved one vanishes.

    A spirited celebration of the contributions of refugees to Ottawa, and of our community's welcome for refugees.  The event is an Open House at Amnesty’s beautiful historic building on Laurier Avenue East and will present an opportunity for the general public to engage in activism for refugee rights.  Inspiring speakers. Light refreshments.  Live music.

    New Canadians Bushra Alarim and Husam Aldakhil will speak about their experience of being welcomed in Ottawa.  Alex Neve, Secretary General of Amnesty International Canada, will open the event.

    We are delighted that Surai Tea will provide its organic jasmine scented teas, handcrafted in Canada and packaged by Syrian-Canadian refugees.

    Musical appearances by Lee Hayes VOX! and by Adesso

    Mark World Refugee Day with us! 

    Join the Facebook event. 

     

    Speaker Bios

    Implementing the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Priorities, Partnerships, and Next Steps

    21 November. 2017

    Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau

    9:00 – 17:00

    Free admission / Entrée gratuite

    Lunch provided / Repas compris

    Optional donation / Don facultative

     

    Webcast / Webdiffusion: livestream.com/uqo

    Facebook: goo.gl/eKtHpz

    Eventbrite: goo.gl/byNYZ5

    Coalition for the Human Rights of Indigenous Peoples /

    Coalition canadienne pour les droits des peuples autochtones: chrip.ca

     

    Opening Reception (in person only, not webcast)

    20 November 2017

    Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau

     

    18:30 – 21:00

    The Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould

      By Jacqueline Hansen, Amnesty International's Major Campaigns and Women's Human Rights Campaigner.

    Holly Jarrett is the grassroots activist behind the “Am I Next?” viral social media campaign. Originally from Labrador and now based in Ontario, she has worked with national Aboriginal organizations, including Inuit organizations, since 1991, and has been a grassroots organizer since 1998. Holly’s cousin, Loretta Saunders, was murdered in Halifax earlier this year. Follow the Am I Next? campaign on Facebook. 

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