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Canada

    Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Un Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Calls to Action & Imperatives for Change.

    Panelists: Doug White, jennifer Preston, Paul Joffe, Craig Benjamin.

     

    Contact: douglas.white@viu.ca

     

    Photo: Demonstrators participate in peaceful protest on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, 21 December 2012. Susanne Ure/ Amnesty International

    Do you live in the Vancouver Lower Mainland? If so, join us for a free webinar on March 17 at 7 PM.

    Register now!

    We have all heard deeply disturbing reports about Canadian mining companies involved in human rights violations around the world, including in Africa, Latin America and Asia.

    Join this webinar to find out what you can do to help hold Canadian mining companies accountable for harming people in other countries, and to make sure that people who have been harmed by Canadian companies are able to seek justice in Canada.

    This webinar is for residents of the Vancouver Lower Mainland who are interested in human rights and mining justice. We will bring together people from different political ridings to strategize about lobbying their Member of Parliament (MP).

    Special guest: a local MP will join us and talk about how easy and effective it is to talk to your Member of Parliament about issues you are concerned about.

    The scale and severity of violence faced by Indigenous women and girls requires a corresponding commitment by government to ensuring their safety. Amnesty International has long called for a comprehensive, coordinated national plan of action to address gaps in current policies, programs and services; involve Indigenous women’s organizations in identifying the necessary solutions; and ensure accountability in their delivery.

    A number of organizations are calling on their supporters to join this timely rally at BC Hydro headquarters in Vancouver. 

    The Peace River Valley in northeastern British Columbia is a unique ecosystem and one of the very few areas in the region that so far has been largely preserved from large-scale resource development. First Nations and Métis families and communities rely on the valley for hunting and fishing, gathering berries and sacred medicine, and holding ceremonies. Their ancestors are buried in this land.

    The proposed $8 billion plus Site C hydroelectric dam would flood more than 80 km of the river valley, stretching west from Fort St. John. The severe impact on Indigenous peoples is beyond dispute. A joint federal-province environmental impact assessment concluded that the dam would “severely undermine” use of the land, would make fishing unsafe for at least a generation, and would submerge burial grounds and other crucial cultural and historical sites.

    Hi-Ho Mistahey! by Alanis Obomsawin, National Film Board of Canada

    Hi-Ho Mistahey, a powerful new documentary by acclaimed filmmaker Alanis Obomsawim, tells the story of Shannen's Dream, a grassroots youth movement standing up for First Nations children and their right to equitable access to schools and education.

    Until February 16, you can click on the link above to view Hi-Ho Mistahey!  online. This special streaming presentation of the documentary is in collaboration with Have a Heart Day. Have a Heart Day is a national campaign, initiated by the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society to promote the rights of First Nations children.

    More information on Have a Heart Day

    Join Amnesty International at a Red Dress concert to raise awareness of our Stolen Sisters campaign. 

    With the 2016 release of her album Holding Patterns the Red Dress single and video, and Amanda Rheaume continues her history of advocating change through her work – and this time, it’s personal. 

    Red Dress was recorded to honour the over 1,180 Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada. 

    The Centre’s “Red Dress Concert” will be an expression of community solidarity and awareness-raising for this ongoing national tragedy. 

    Check out the Red Dress Single and Video here: https://youtu.be/AeoJWh0Ujr4

    Tickets are $23 (including all taxes)

    Children in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) inhale toxic dust as they mine the cobalt that powers the batteries we rely on for our phones, tablets and laptops. Yet global electronics manufacturers won’t tell us if their cobalt supply chains are tainted by child labour. They have a responsibility to do so –to check for and address child labour in their supply chains, setting an example for the rest of the industry to follow. Electric vehicle companies also need to ensure that their car batteries do not contain cobalt mined by children.

    TAKE ACTION

    Clare Bayley’s provocative depiction of migrant smuggling won the Amnesty International Freedom of Expression Award for its unflinching and empathetic portrayal of the very human stories behind the statistics. 

    When the doors of the container shut behind you, let your eyes adjust as you meet five complex individuals: Fatima, Asha, Jemal, Ahmad and Mariam. You join them on the final leg of their voyage, as they are smuggled across Europe in the confined space of a shipping container. The only thing they have in common is their goal: to get to England and start a new life. Witness them torn between greed and generosity, watched over by the mysterious Agent who orchestrates their journey. With freedom so close, what price would you pay?

    Show runs from September 4-18, Thursday and Fridays at 6 & 9PM, Saturdays and Sundays at 3 & 6PM.

    Join us for this conversation between Thomas King and Craig Benjamin. If you are not on the Amnesty Book Club Newsletter, you are encouraged to sign up and not miss the event. Sign up for the newsletter at AmnestyBookClub.ca. The event will revolve around Mr. King's 2015 Amnesty Book Club Reader's Choice Selection, The Inconvenient Indian. All are welcome and you do not need to have read the book to enjoy the conversation! If you have questions for Mr. King, the Book Club, or about this event in general, please send an email to bookclub@amnesty.ca

    Don't miss The Inconvenient Indian discussion guide for more insights into the book, and Amnesty's work with Indigenous Peoples. 

    Join us on Parliament Hill for the 6th Annual Families of Sisters in Spirit Vigil to honour the memory of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. 

    Details about other events and vigils in Ottawa on October 4th will be posted as more information becomes available. 

    On Friday, February 26th, at 7:30 p.m. in Room B-112 of Okanagan College, 1000 KLO Road, Amnesty International's Kelowna group presents "Highway of Tears"- a documentary film about the disappearances of at least 40 young women, mostly aboriginal, since the 1960s on Highway 16 in northern B.C.  A recent RCMP special investigation linked DNA from one of the missing women to a deceased American criminal.  The cases reveal sweeping crimes: kidnapping, rape, torture, murder and the disposal of human bodies.  The women have been victims not only of murderous predators but also of a pervasive systemic racism that has kept them marginalized on impoverished reservations.  First Nations leaders and activists contend that there has been little interest in further investigating the crimes and in apprehending their killers.  Admission is by donation.  More information at 250-769-4740.

    Let the Indigenous peoples of the Peace River valley know that you stand with them in their fight against the Site C dam

    Join our global campaigning on Site C by sending a solidarity message or photograph of yourself to show you support their struggle to protect their ancestral lands.

    Add your photo or message to this page by posting on twitter or instagram using the hashtag #withthePeaceRiver.

    What would resource extraction and development look like if the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was implemented in Canada? This panel attempts to answer that question. We'll hear from Indigenous rights advocates and legal experts about what UNDRIP is, how it has been contravened by projects like the Site C dam in BC and the Alton Gas project in Nova Scotia, and processes developed by Indigenous communities to give, or withhold, consent. Panelists will discuss the topic in broad terms as well as offer specific insights to ongoing projects and resistance movements. This event is co-sponsored by the Council of Canadians and Halifax Public Libraries. 

    We're excited to announce that registration is now open for the 2016 Amnesty Youth Activist Conference in Saskatchewan. The goals of the Conference are to connect young activists and those interested in getting involved in human rights activism for a day of inspiration and learning!

    The Amnesty Youth Conference will take place in Saskatoon on Saturday, October 15 and in Regina on Sunday, October 16.

    The agenda will include: a panel discussion featuring experienced activists, Amnesty 101 (an introduction to Amnesty International), and a session on how to be a successful activist and what's next (using your activism skills after the conference). As well, we will hold workshops on Amnesty International's Cobalt campaign, refugee rights, Indigenous rights, and supporting human rights defenders in the Americas.

    The morning will start with yoga (optional) and registration at 9 am, with the program officially beginning at 9:45 am. The Conference will finish at 4:30 pm.

    Please come and join us for a lively discussion of our book choice, human rights, and how you can make a difference. 

    We're reading Monkey Beach by Eden Robinson

    Bring a friend, all welcome!

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