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Indonesia

    September 29, 2015

    Posted at 0001hrs GMT  30 September 2015

    Indonesian authorities are abandoning millions of victims and their family members who suffered through one of the worst mass killings in modern times, Amnesty International said on the 50th anniversary of the events that triggered the government-led atrocities of 1965 and 1966.

    “Five decades is far too long to wait for justice for one of the worst mass killings of our era. Across Indonesia, victims of the 1965 and 1966 events and their family members have been left to fend for themselves, while those suspected of criminal responsibility walk free,” said Papang Hidayat, Amnesty International’s Indonesia Researcher.

    “Indonesian authorities must put an end to this injustice once and for all. Today’s anniversary must be the starting point for a new era where crimes of the past are no longer swept under the carpet.”

    In the wake of a failed coup attempt on 30 September 1965, the Indonesian military – led by Major General Suharto – launched a systematic attack against suspected communists and a range of other leftists.

    August 13, 2015

    Indonesia is still failing tens of thousands affected by the devastating Aceh conflict, leaving family members and victims in the dark about the fate of loved ones and without justice, truth and full reparation Amnesty International said ahead of the 10-year anniversary of the conflict’s end.        

    Saturday 15 August 2015 marks a decade since the peace agreement that signaled the end of the Aceh conflict. But despite promises by successive Indonesian governments, victims are still left to fend for themselves while authorities show little interest in addressing past crimes.

    “This has been a lost decade for far too many people affected by the Aceh conflict. Even if the violence has ended, Indonesian authorities have almost completely failed in their duty to provide truth, justice and full reparation to tens of thousands of victims and their family members,” said Josef Benedict, Amnesty International’s Campaigns Director for South East Asia.

    April 28, 2015

    The execution of eight people in Indonesia today shows complete disregard for due process and human rights safeguards, Amnesty International said. The organization also called for any plans to carry out further executions to be scrapped.

    Eight people, including Indonesian and foreign nationals, were today put to death by firing squad on Nusakambangan Island, off Java. All of them had been convicted of drug trafficking. The execution of a Filipina national, Mary Jane Fiesta Veloso, was halted at the last minute by President Widodo

    “These executions are utterly reprehensible– they were carried out with complete disregard for internationally recognized safeguards on the use of the death penalty,” said Rupert Abbott, Amnesty International’s Research Director for Southeast Asia and the Pacific.

    “President Joko Widodo should immediately abandon plans to carry out further executions and impose a moratorium on the death penalty as a first step towards abolition.”

    April 26, 2015

    Amnesty International Australia Release

    Amnesty International is calling for an immediate and urgent halt to plans to execute a group of prisoners in Indonesia, including Australians Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran, following confirmation of 72 hours notice until the state sanctioned killings take place.

    “If these executions go ahead, they'll be a serious stain on Indonesia's human rights record and Joko Widodo’s Presidency and damage relations between Indonesia and its friends, including Australia,” said Diana Sayed, Human Rights Lawyer and Amnesty International Australia Crisis Campaigner.

    “Hundreds of thousands of people from right around Australia and the world have continued to respectfully call for a halt to the executions and mercy for those on death row.

    "Despite their pleas, it’s deeply troubling the Indonesian government is apparently determined to push ahead with more killings, despite showing promise to move away from the death penalty until executions resumed in 2013.”  

    February 18, 2015

    The Indonesian government must halt the imminent execution of 11 people and scrap plans to put even more people to death this year, Amnesty International said in an open letter to President Joko Widodo today.

    Indonesia’s Attorney General has confirmed that 11 executions of death row prisoners convicted for drug trafficking and murder will be carried out imminently. The prisoners include both foreigners and Indonesian nationals.

    January 17, 2015

    Posted at 0030 18 January 2015 Indonesia time

    The execution of six drug traffickers in Indonesia today, the first since President Joko Widodo took office, is a retrograde step for human rights in the country, Amnesty International said.

    Those executed by firing squad today included one Indonesian and five foreign nationals. All had been convicted on drug trafficking charges.

    “This is a seriously regressive move and a very sad day. The new administration has taken office on the back of promises to make human rights a priority, but the execution of six people flies in the face of these commitments,” said Rupert Abbott, Amnesty International’s Research Director for Southeast Asia and the Pacific.

    While no executions were carried out in Indonesia in 2014, the new government has since it took office in November 2014 announced that 20 are scheduled for this year.

    In December 2014, it was also reported that President Joko Widodo would not grant clemency to at least 64 individuals who have been sentenced to death for drug-related crimes and that there were plans to execute them.

    January 15, 2015

    Indonesia must immediately halt plans to put to death six people – one Indonesian and five foreign nationals – by firing squad this week, Amnesty International said after the Attorney General’s office today confirmed the executions would be carried out on Sunday 18 January 2015.

    “These executions must be stopped immediately. The death penalty is a human rights violation, and it is shocking that the Indonesian authorities are looking to put to death six people this Sunday,” said Rupert Abbott, Amnesty International’s Research Director for Southeast Asia and the Pacific.

    “Indonesia’s new government took office on the back of promises to improve respect for human rights, but carrying out these executions would be a regressive move. Rather than putting to death more people, the government should immediately impose a moratorium on the use of the death penalty with a view to its eventual abolition.”

    December 05, 2014

    The Indonesian government’s apparent plans to execute five people by the end of the year must be halted immediately, Amnesty International said today. The organization urged the government to impose a moratorium on the implementation of the death penalty with a view to its eventual abolition.

    Local media reports indicate that the five death row prisoners have now been moved into isolation, as preparations for their executions begin.

    Indonesia’s Junior Attorney General for General Crimes, Basyuni Masyarif, last week confirmed that the government is planning to execute five people before the end of the year.

    “The government must immediately halt plans to carry out executions. Given President Joko Widodo’s campaign commitments to improve respect for human rights, resorting to the death penalty would be a serious stain on the early human rights record of his adminsitration,” said Rupert Abbott, Amnesty International’s Research Director for Southeast Asia and the Pacific.

    November 20, 2014

    Posted at 0300hrs GMT   21 November 2014

    Indonesian authorities have increasingly made use of a range of oppressive blasphemy laws to imprison individuals for their beliefs, contributing to an intensifying climate of intolerance in the country, Amnesty International said in a new briefing today. 

    Prosecuting Beliefs shows that the number of blasphemy convictions skyrocketed during former President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s decade in power (2004-2014) compared to previous administrations. Scores of individuals have been imprisoned – some for nothing more than whistling while praying, posting their opinions on Facebook or saying they had received a “revelation from God”. 

    September 26, 2014

    A new law in Indonesia’s Aceh province that imposes up to 100 lashes of the cane for “crimes” such as same-sex sexual activity and sex outside marriage is an enormous stepbackwards for human rights, Amnesty International said.

    The Aceh parliament today passed the Aceh Islamic Criminal Code, a bylaw which criminalizes a range of acts – including same-sex sexual activity, sex outside marriage and “being alone with someone of the opposite sex who is not a marriage partner or relative” (khalwat). Those found guilty could face caning, imprisonment or fines imposed by Islamic courts.

    “This bylaw should never have been passed and is an enormous step backwards for human rights in Aceh – the Aceh parliament should immediately repeal or revise the provisions of the bylaw which violate human rights ,” said Richard Bennett, Amnesty International’s Asia Pacific Director.

    July 22, 2014

    Indonesia’s new President Joko Widodo must deliver on campaign promises to improve Indonesia’s dire human rights situation, Amnesty International said.

    Widodo, who today was confirmed as winner of the 9 July presidential elections, has pledged to champion human rights during his time in the office – including addressing serious past human rights abuses, protecting freedom of religion, reforming the police and opening up access to Papua for international observers.

    “It’s encouraging that President Widodo has talked about his commitment to human rights during his election campaign - now he must deliver,” said Richard Bennett, Amnesty International’s Asia Pacific Director.

    “The new government has the opportunity to turn a page to an era when human rights are genuinely respected in Indonesia. Widodo’s victory will have raised the hopes of many brave human rights activists and victims who have struggled against impunity for years – those hopes must not be dashed.”

    April 29, 2014

    President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono’s decade in office has been marked by only patchy progress on human rights and Indonesia’s next leader must urgently tackle ongoing violations and repeal repressive and discriminatory laws, Amnesty International said today in a human rights agenda for Indonesia’s presidential candidates.

    With campaigning under way for Indonesia’s presidential election on 9 July 2014, the agenda covers eight key human rights issues that the new administration should tackle.

    “It is disappointing that during the campaigning period the candidates have so far mostly ignored human rights. Indonesia has come a long way over the past decade, but there are still serious challenges remaining that the candidates should address,” said Rupert Abbott, Amnesty International’s Deputy Asia Pacific Director.

    There have been some human rights improvements during President Yudhoyono’s administration (2004-2014), including the introduction of new human rights regulations for policing as well as legal reforms strengthening witness protection.

    November 18, 2013

    The execution of a Pakistani man in Indonesia on Sunday, carried out in secret, is a shocking and regressive step, said Amnesty International.

    According to media reports, Muhammad Abdul Hafeez, 44, was executed by firing squad in the early hours of Sunday morning. Hafeez is the fifth person to be put to death this year since Indonesia resumed executions in March after a four year hiatus.  A further five individuals are believed to be at imminent risk of execution.

    Papang Hidayat, Amnesty International’s Indonesia Researcher, commented:

    “This latest death by firing squad highlights the deplorable and retrograde trend in Indonesia to shroud executions in secrecy. The complete lack of transparency is not only devastating for the individuals and their families; it can also prevent last minute appeals for a stay of execution.

    September 05, 2013

    Indonesia: Kopassus conviction small step towards ending impunity

    The conviction of eight Kopassus (Special Forces Command) soldiers today is a step towards ending impunity In Indonesia, but also highlights how military courts are not fit to try its own soldiers for human rights violations, Amnesty International said.

    Three Kopassus soldiers were convicted of the premeditated murder of four unarmed detainees at Cebongan prison outside Yogyakarta on 23 March this year and sentenced to between six and 11 years’ in prison. The men will be appealing their sentences.

    Another five soldiers were given shorter sentences for assisting the main perpetrators, with sentences against four more soldiers expected tomorrow.

    “While today’s verdict provides some justice for the families of the victims, much more needs to be done to address ongoing impunity and reform the military,” said Isabelle Arradon, Amnesty International’s Deputy Asia Pacific Director.

    August 15, 2013

    Calls for truth, justice and reparation by victims of the devastating Aceh conflict are gathering momentum despite serious remaining challenges, Amnesty International said as it published a briefing to mark the eighth anniversary of the conflict’s end.

    The briefing, No Peace without Justice, examines how countless victims and family members in Aceh are still left without knowing the truth about the conflict, and highlights a number of cases of human rights violations by the security forces.

    At the same time there have been some positive developments in addressing the conflict’s legacy, such as a new, potentially key investigation by the Indonesian National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM) into human rights violations by security forces in Aceh.

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