Select this search icon to access the amnesty.ca search form

Main menu

Facebook Share

Mexico

    May 04, 2019

     

    PLEASE NOTE: This action is open until the first week of June.

    Throughout the month of May, we are collecting cards to echo the calls for action by mothers of the disappeared in Mexico.

    May 10 is Mother's Day in Mexico. Thousands of mothers marked the date by taking part in a huge Mother's Day March for Dignity (promoted in their poster, left), carrying the photos of sons and daughters who disappeared, never to be seen again. The mothers of the disappeared organize the march to make visible the massive dimensions of this heart-rending crisis and to call for action.

    Our solidarity is vital!

    More than 40,000 people are now reported missing in Mexico. It's a staggering number that only continues to grow. Some people were abducted by criminal gangs. In other cases, public officials were involved.

    March 12, 2019

    President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s government took some steps to improve the human rights situation in Mexico during the first 100 days of his administration but has yet to take the kind of emphatic action that would convince the country of his commitment to change, said Amnesty International today.

    “Mexico has a long and disturbing history of human rights violations. In recent years, the country has descended into a serious crisis. After decades of struggle by human rights organizations and victims’ groups, it would be a tragedy to miss this opportunity to change the country’s direction,” said Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas Director at Amnesty International.

    “President López Obrador must acknowledge and prioritize the major human rights challenges facing the country. Now is the time to take concrete action to achieve genuine change. Recognition of the work done by human rights defenders and organizations, as well as support for them, must be a priority for the president.”

    February 27, 2019

    Samir Flores Soberanes via Twitter

    DOWNLOAD PDF OF UA 24/19 HERE

    Samir Flores Soberanes, an environmental, land and territory human rights defender, was killed on 20 February, after receiving several death threats for his work defending the territory of his community. Members of an unknown armed group shot him four times, twice in the head, outside his house.

    Samir was a member of a grassroots collective called the Front of Peoples in Defense of the Earth and Water (FPDTA) in the states of Morelos, Puebla and Tlaxcala (southeast Mexico). The FPDTA is dedicated to protecting the environment and the territory in the area. He was vocal in his opposition to the thermal-electric plant and pipeline project called “Proyecto Integral Morelos”. As a result, he had received written death threats and in October 2018, an unidentified group of attackers beat him. The day before he was killed, Samir attended an information session on the project and expressed concerns about its human rights and social impacts.  

    February 22, 2019

    Obtilia (left) responds with joy to messages of solidarity from Amnesty Canada supporters during a visit to Guerrero in 2009. 

    DOWNLOAD PDF HERE

    Armed men abducted Mexican Indigenous human rights defenders, Obtilia Eugenio Manuel and Hilario Cornelio Castro on 12 February 2019 in Guerrero state. Their captors released them on 16 February amidst an increasing national and international outcry over their disappearance. They will continue to be at risk until those responsible for the attack are brought to justice because they continue to carry on their human rights work.

    January 31, 2019
    Mexico USA border wall with barbed wire at top

    Amnesty International Canada Secretary General Alex Neve is currently part of a delegation of senior Amnesty leadership who are visiting the Mexico/USA border to witness the impacts of US policy on migrants and asylum seekers.|

    El Paso, Texas

    So many times over the past two years, since Donald Trump’s presidency and assault on the rights of refugees and migrants began, I have asked myself: what more will it take for the Canadian government to agree that the United States is not “safe” when it comes to refugee protection?

    And while I do not have the answer yet, as the accounts of utter contempt for international obligations and the lack of even a minimal sense of compassion mounted during our visit to Tijuana, El Paso and Ciudad Juárez this week, as a Canadian I felt a deepening sense of shame that this remains an open question.

    What more will it take?

    January 30, 2019

    Photo: Mother and son holding hands at the shelter for the Migrant Caravan in November 2018. 

    Amnesty International Canada Secretary General Alex Neve is currently part of a delegation of senior Amnesty leadership who are visiting the Mexico/USA border to witness the impacts of US policy on migrants and asylum seekers. 

    The polarizing and politicized discourse about refugees, migrant and border policy in the United States revolves around ugly chants and a long list of terms and agencies that are at once sinister and incomprehensible: #BuildTheWall, Migration Protection Protocols, ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement), Customs and Border Patrol, pushbacks and zero-tolerance.

    But what is truly at stake and so lost in the swirling toxic debate are peoples’ hopes, lives and rights.

    January 28, 2019

    Amnesty International Canada Secretary General Alex Neve is currently part of a delegation of senior Amnesty leadership who are visiting the Mexico/USA border to witness the impacts of US policy on migrants and asylum seekers. 

    Tijuana, Mexico

    We began the day walking across the border between the United States and Mexico, separating San Ysidro, California and Tijuana. We ended the day back at that exact same border post, accompanying three courageous LGBTQ teens from Honduras as they sought, against considerable odds, to lodge their asylum claims with US officials.

    In between we had ample occasion to see and hear firsthand that despite Donald Trump’s toxic rhetoric, the only crisis that is playing out along this frontier is a politically-driven one that spreads distortions and fear on the backs of people – mainly, but not only, from Mexico and Central America – who are fleeing terrifying persecution, endemic violence and grinding poverty.

    It is a crisis of conscience, compassion and justice.

    January 24, 2019

    The Mexican state failed in its obligation to ensure the effective protection of the environmental human rights defender Julián Carrillo, said Amnesty International in the report Caught between bullets and neglect: Lack of protection for defenders of the territory in the Sierra Tarahumara, published today, three months after his death.

    “The Indigenous Rarámuri people of the community of Coloradas de la Virgen have for years faced a series of attacks and threats because of their work defending human rights and their ancestral territory,” said Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas director at Amnesty International.

    “The killing of Julián Carrillo is the most obvious and appalling evidence of the Mexican authorities’ failure to comply with their obligation to guarantee effective protection from all types of violence, threats or reprisals resulting from their work defending human rights.”

    December 06, 2018

    Following a statement from the Regional Public Prosecutor for Puebla state, Jaime Huerta, in relation to the arrest of an individual allegedly connected to the killing of the environmental defender Manuel Gaspar Rodríguez, and the claim that the crime could be attributed to personal problems, Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas director at Amnesty International, said:

    “It is essential that the authorities carry out a comprehensive, independent and impartial investigation, including into those who could have ordered or planned the killing of Manuel Gaspar Rodríguez. If it fails to do so, the Public Prosecutor’s Office would be sending a message of impunity and encouraging further attacks against defenders of the land, territory and environment.”

    “Amnesty International urges the Mexican authorities to include within the line of investigation the possibility that the attack could be related to Manuel Gaspar’s work to defend the environment, before hastily speaking out about possible motives for his killing.”

    December 04, 2018

    By Maha Asad, Amnesty Canada's National Youth Action and Advisory Council

    Signing petitions and writing letters to protect human rights matters! Achieving our desired goals may take time but raising our voices helps create pressure. I saw that first hand during a visit to the Embassy of Mexico in Ottawa on November 20th.

    We met with Ambassador Arturo Hernández Basave (below 3R) and Legal Affairs Secretary Alfonso Vera Sanchez (left) and handed over more than 35,000 messages of support, solidarity and calls for action on behalf of the 43 disappeared students of Ayotzinapa, as well as other victims of grave human rights abuses in Mexico.

    November 28, 2018

    Amnesty International launched a campaign today urging President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador to take concrete measures during the first 100 days of his administration to improve the human rights situation in Mexico.

    “The government of President-elect López Obrador has a historic opportunity to build a Mexico in which the human rights of every individual are respected and protected,” said Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas Director at Amnesty International.

    “The mistakes of the past cannot keep being repeated. We ask the next government to take decisive, timely and effective measures to improve the human rights situation in Mexico and to demonstrate that the rights of individuals in the country will be at the core of all public policy and government action.”

    November 21, 2018

    Kumi Naidoo, Amnesty International’s Secretary General, has addressed Mexican president elect, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, in response to his recent announcements regarding the creation of a National Guard conformed by trained military personnel and federal police to take over public security in Mexico.

    Find the video of Kumi Naidoo calling on Andrés Manuel López Obrador to prevent further militarization of Mexico on Facebook or download the file here.

    Below an excerpt of the video transcript:

    November 15, 2018

    In response to the announcement made by the government of Mexican president-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who will take office on 1 December, in relation to a proposal for a train that would run across five states in south-eastern Mexico, Erika Guevara-Rosas, Americas Director at Amnesty International, said:

    “The new authorities must ensure that this mega-project only goes ahead if the Indigenous Peoples who could potentially be affected give their free, prior and informed consent. Mexico must respect its obligations under international law and properly consult Indigenous Peoples on public policies and government actions that could affect their rights to territory and their economic, social and cultural rights.”

    October 26, 2018
    DOWNLOAD PDF OF UA 187/18 HERE

    Julián Carrillo was shot to death on 24 October, after receiving several death threats for his work defending the territory of his Indigenous community in Mexico. He is the latest death in a series of killings, including several members of his family and Indigenous authorities. The community fears that other attacks could take place.

    Indigenous environmental, land and territory defender, Julián Carrillo was shot dead by an unknown person in the state of Chihuahua (northern Mexico) in the evening of 24 October. According to his family, they heard shooting in the mountains and, hours later, Julián Carrillo’s body was found disfigured by shots from high-calibre firearms. Since 23 October, Julián Carrillo was in hiding in the Tarahumara mountain range because he was being followed by members of an alleged organized crime group in his community of Coloradas de la Virgen.

    October 26, 2018

    The killing of the Rarámuri Indigenous human rights defender Julián Carrillo in the state of Chihuahua yesterday highlights yet again the lack of protection and inefficiency of the protective measures provided by the Mexican authorities to the Indigenous communities of the Sierra Tarahumara, Amnesty International said today.

    “Once again we have seen how, without changes which take into account the structural causes of the violence against human rights defenders, providing a police escort or a telephone is not enough to stop the wave of violence facing those who dare to speak out to defend their territory”, said Erika Guevara Rosas, Americas Director at Amnesty International.

    Pages

    Subscribe to Mexico