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Nauru

    July 03, 2018

    Responding to the news that Nauru’s government has banned journalists from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) from attending the Pacific Islands Forum in September, Minar Pimple Amnesty International’s Senior Director of Global Operations said:

    “This brazen move is a clear attempt at suppressing critical coverage of Nauru’s government and its inhumane treatment of refugees.

    “The country’s current arrangements with Australia on refugee policy are a matter of journalistic and public interest. Going to these lengths to keep certain media out of the country is both an arbitrary, unacceptable restriction of press freedom and a telling sign of the government’s determination to keep the appalling situation of refugees in Nauru out of the news.

    “Hosting a pan-regional event like the Pacific Islands Forum comes with the responsibility of opening yourself up to the region’s media. The Nauru government must not dictate who should and shouldn’t be attending, nor should it be issuing guidance on what journalists can and cannot report.”

     

    February 22, 2018
    Amnesty International publishes State of the World’s Human Rights report for 2017 to 2018 “Last year our world was immersed in crises, with prominent leaders offering us a nightmarish vision of a society blinded by hatred and fear. This emboldened those who promote bigotry, but it inspired far more people to campaign for a more hopeful future,” says Salil Shetty, head of Amnesty International

    The world is reaping the terrifying consequences of hate-filled rhetoric that threatens to normalize massive discrimination against marginalized groups, Amnesty International warned today as it launched its annual assessment of human rights.

    Nevertheless, the organization found that a growing movement of both first-time and seasoned activists campaigning for social justice provides real hope of reversing the slide towards oppression.

    The report, The State of the World’s Human Rights, covers 159 countries and delivers the most comprehensive analysis of the state of human rights in the world today.

    April 29, 2014

    Nauru’s refusal to grant Amnesty International access to its Australian-run asylum seeker detention centre appears to be the latest attempt to avoid public scrutiny of the treatment of asylum seekers there.

    The Nauru government has declined Amnesty International’s request to visit the detention centre, based on "the current circumstances and incredibly busy time," despite the organization’s suggestion of alternative dates.

    This latest obstruction follows Nauru reneging earlier this month on allowing a team of UN human rights observers to access the centre, citing "practical difficulties."

    In February 2014, the cost of visas for journalists visiting Nauru was increased from AUD $200 to $8,000.

    "Nauru’s refusals to allow an independent review of the conditions in the detention centre are another damning development in Australia’s offshore asylum processing system," said Rupert Abbott, Amnesty International’s Deputy Asia Pacific Director.

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