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Indigenous Peoples

      We celebrate Have a Heart Day this February, and stand with First Nations children for the same chance to grow up safely at home, get a good education, be healthy, and proud of their cultures.  Join Toronto’s Amnesty International Action Network for Women’s Human Rights (ANWHR) for a night of arts and crafts, letter writing and sweet treats as we send messages to our Prime Minister and Members of Canadian Parliament to ask them to Have A Heart for our First Nation's children. Date: Thursday, 11 February 
    Time: 7:00PM - 9:00PM (Drop in whenever you can)
    Where: Amnesty International Toronto Office, 1992 Yonge Street, 3rd Floor FREE Event! Children friendly event. Everyone is welcome. For more details contact: anwhr@aito.ca   FACEBOOK page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1684803838462270/  

    Join Amnesty International and One World Film Festival for a special 10th anniversary screening of Freedom Drum. 

    The evening will also feature the films Water Warriors and The Three Sisters Community Garden, presented by Interpares. 

    About the Film: 

    Freedom Drum

    Directed by Monica Virtue | Canada | 2007 | 11 min

    On October 12, 2006 at sunrise on Victoria Island in Ottawa members of The Midnight Messenger, Amnesty International Canada’s human rights drum circle, raised their voices in song and beat their drums in a steady rhythm that marked the beginning of a 24-hour vigil in support of the UN Declaraction on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The vigil was a call to action to the Canadian government to reinstate support the the Declaration and for Canada make good on its claims that it did good things for Indigenous peoples.

    The One World Film Festival presents this special 10th anniversary screening of Freedom Drum, which was originally screened at the Festival in 2007 as part of its focus on First Peoples – First Stories, in partnership with Amnesty International Canada

    What would resource extraction and development look like if the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was implemented in Canada? This panel attempts to answer that question. We'll hear from Indigenous rights advocates and legal experts about what UNDRIP is, how it has been contravened by projects like the Site C dam in BC and the Alton Gas project in Nova Scotia, and processes developed by Indigenous communities to give, or withhold, consent. Panelists will discuss the topic in broad terms as well as offer specific insights to ongoing projects and resistance movements. This event is co-sponsored by the Council of Canadians and Halifax Public Libraries. 

    Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Un Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Calls to Action & Imperatives for Change.

    Panelists: Doug White, jennifer Preston, Paul Joffe, Craig Benjamin.

     

    Contact: douglas.white@viu.ca

     

    Photo: Demonstrators participate in peaceful protest on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, 21 December 2012. Susanne Ure/ Amnesty International

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