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Refugee Protection in Canada

    July 23, 2013

    Your support for Amnesty International has helped us achieve a legal victory in Canada that could have far reaching and live-saving implications for refugees who seek asylum in Canada and elsewhere.

    In July 2013, Canada’s highest court, the Supreme Court of Canada, ruled in the case of Rachidi Ekanza Ezokola, a case that grapples with the thorny issue of who can be excluded from refugee status. Their unanimous decision has brought Canada’s interpretation fully into line with international law.

    Amnesty’s first-rate team of pro bono lawyers, comprised of Michael Bossin, Laïla Demirdache and Chantal Tie, assisted by our Legal Coordinator Anna Shea, laid out our position in arguments before the Court back in January 2013. We've waited six months for the decision.

    April 04, 2013

    April 4 is Refugee Rights Day in Canada.

    This day marks the anniversary of the Supreme Court’s 1985 Singh decision. In this decision the Supreme Court found that the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects the fundamental rights of refugees. The Court decided that where the Charter declares ‘Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice;’  ‘everyone’ includes refugees.

    Today the Canadian Council for Refugees and other organizations across Canada announced the launch of a campaign designed to transform the conversation about refugees in Canada. Under the banner ‘Proud to Protect Refugees’, they are dedicated to new efforts to promote a positive vision of what we want for refugees and of the important contributions refugees make to our  communities.

    They are calling on all Canadians to show their pride in protecting refugees.

    December 14, 2012

    On the eve of the introduction of important changes to Canada’s refugee determination system, the Canadian Council for Refugees and Amnesty International expressed fear that the system will fail some refugees, violate their rights in Canada, and send them back to persecution.

    “The whole purpose of our refugee system is to protect people whose lives and liberty are threatened in their country of origin,” said Loly Rico, President of the Canadian Council for Refugees. “But the new system does not take their realities into account, particularly the realities of the most vulnerable, such as survivors of torture and women who have experienced sexual violence. They may end up being wrongly rejected.”

    Drop by the Amnesty table during the World Refugee Day celebration at the Victoria Library, Central Branch. Crafts, music, food and community information tables.Other events June 15-20, see the attached poster or go to the Facebook page for more information.

     

     

    The Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act (PCISA), Bill C-31 became law on June 28, 2012. Some parts of the new Act came into force immediately, and other parts of the Act will come into force later this year; most likely in mid-December.

    Amnesty International believes that PCISA falls far short of Canada’s international human rights and refugee protection obligations and will result in serious violations of the rights of refugees and migrants. 

    For more information please see:

    Canadian Council for Refugees
    Canadian Association for Refugee Lawyers

    You can learn more about Amnesty International’s concerns here. 

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