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Write for Rights

    December 09, 2019

    Join activists around the world this Human Rights Day for a letter-writing marathon on Twitter and Instagram.

    Write for Rights is the world’s largest human rights events and on Human Rights Day we want the world to see how far and wide the campaign reaches, and all the great work we do to change lives.

    On or around December 10th, 2019 we will be using Twitter and Instagram to show that people all over the world are writing letters for young people around the world fighting for human rights. You can find more information on Write for Rights cases here.

    Let’s show the world that human rights matter, by making the 2019 Write for Rights hashtags #Write4Rights and #W4R19 appear in conversations online throughout the day!

    Here are some sample tweets for each 2019 case. Just click the link to tweet the text! Each will come with a link to the action.

    December 05, 2019
    On June 20, 2019, members of the Grassy Narrows First Nation travelled 1,700 km from their homes in northwest Ontario to Toronto to protest against the devastating mercury crisis that has persisted for decades in their lands.

    In the coming weeks and months, Amnesty will be doing everything we can to support the people of Grassy Narrows to finally achieve the justice they deserve. The youth-led campaign for mercury justice is one of the focal cases of this year’s global Write for Rights campaign, marking the beginning of a year-long campaign mobilizing Amnesty members and supporters in Canada and around the world. Sign up for Write for Rights now.

    The people of Grassy Narrows First Nation in northwest Ontario have been hard-hit by mercury poisoning, after the government allowed a pulp mill to dump 10 tons of waste into a river in the 1960s. The damaging effects are still seen today.

    Next year marks 50 years since the public first became aware of mercury poisoning at Asubpeeschoseewagong (Grassy Narrows). In all this time, the people of the Grassy Narrows First Nation have never received the help they need to deal with the devastating, and still ongoing, consequences of the poisoning of their river system and the fish on which they depend.

    November 29, 2019

    From calling out climate injustice to calling for women’s rights, tackling homelessness to exposing police brutality, children and young people are a leading force for change.

    At 3.1 billion, they account for 42% of the world’s population – many of them in the Global South. Too often, they are the worst affected by the world’s greatest injustices, experiencing first-hand their blistering effects. They see their own communities ripped apart by poverty, inequality, discrimination, corruption – and are compelled to stand up to these forces.

    This year, Amnesty International’s largest human rights campaign, Write for Rights, throws its might behind these children and young people who are overcoming the odds – to support them, give them strength and make it possible for them to continue to dare where adults in authority are failing. 

    >> Sign up for Write for Rights to support these young defenders on December 10th, Human Rights Day

    Grassy Narrows Youth, Canada

    November 26, 2019

    *This blog is written in honour of the late Gary Ockenden, an Amnesty International Canada Board member who tragically and suddenly passed away on November 18, 2019. Gary was a lifelong champion of human rights and was always the first person in any room to find ways to engage, empower, and defend youth advocates. The NYAAC hopes to channel Gary’s fighting spirit and caring disposition in all our future endeavours.*

    Young people around the world are leading the charge against oppression, poverty, climate change, colonialism, sexism, racism, inequality, and repression. But they are also disproportionately vulnerable to persecution and violence. This year, all 10 cases for Write for Rights champions cases of young people across the world - including Canada - who fight for justice and have had their human rights attacked. 

    November 08, 2019
    Amnesty International is inviting you to help change lives on December 10, International Human Rights Day, with the world's biggest grassroots event for human rights: Write for Rights! 

    Last year we sent 5.9 million letters and messages for human rights from more than 200 countries. Here's a list of 10 ways you can get involved:

    1. Start with the simple stuff

    Sign up at Writeathon.ca! From here you can take action online, watch videos about cases, download materials for letter writing, and stay in the loop on cases to be featured on December 10th. 

    October 24, 2019
    Each year, the world’s biggest human rights event just gets bigger. Write for Rights 2018 was no exception, with people writing millions of messages that transformed the lives of women activists worldwide.

    They came in their dozens, hundreds, even thousands. They were students, parents, teachers, friends – ordinary people who took a moment to tweet, type, draw or write a message of support for someone they’d never met. They did this an astonishing 5,911,113 times as part of Amnesty’s 2018 Write for Rights – an annual letter-writing marathon on or around International Human Rights Day (December 10th) that has become the world’s biggest human rights event.

    Sign up for Write for Rights 2019 >>

    October 01, 2019

    So you've signed up to host a Write for Rights event. THANK YOU! Your time and enthusiasm means more people are taking action for human rights on December 10! (Haven't signed up yet? You can still sign up HERE!)

    Planning to write on your own? Register to view our online webinar here >> 

    We've put together a few tips to help you make the most of your event, whether it's just a few people in your living room or a big event downtown!

    October 01, 2019

    Can writing letters actually change things? We know it can. That’s why we run the biggest human rights event in the world every year. 

    Write for Rights 2019 is fast approaching – and we’re excited to have you on board. If you haven't already, sign up at www.writeathon.ca >> 

    Thank you for joining our growing community! We need your help to amp up the volume and get as many people to participate in Write for Rights as we can because more letters mean more power. Social media is a fantastic way to get your message out far and wide.

    Here are some ways you can take the lead online:

    November 26, 2018

    Anielle Franco is an English teacher, former competitive volleyball player, parent of an energetic toddler, and a powerful grassroots advocate for the rights of black women in Brazil.

    She also happens to be the sister of renowned Brazilian women human rights defender and politician Marielle Franco, who was murdered in Rio de Janeiro earlier this year. Jackie Hansen, Amnesty’s Gender Rights Campaigner, reports on Anielle’s human rights work including her ongoing campaign for justice for Marielle.

    November 26, 2018
    On March 8, 2018—International Women’s Day—protesters in Mexico City marched to demand an end to violence against women.

    Women human rights defenders experience harassment and violence because of what they’re advocating for and because of their gender.

    People who advocate for freedom, justice, and equality often do so in an environment where they are demonized and restricted in their work. Many human rights defenders are smeared, threatened, physically attacked, criminalized and sometimes even killed, just for daring to stand up to those in power.

    Imagine now how much harder your life as a human rights defender must be if you were targeted not only for what you do but also for who you are: welcome to your life as a woman human rights defender.

    April 09, 2018

    What’s in a word? More precisely, what’s in a letter? Since the first known correspondence, written in Babylonian times, to the most common form of offline correspondence we receive today: junk mail - the letter has seen a dramatic rise and fall in personal value. Letters have gone from bearing longed-for thoughts from loved ones, to soulless marketing speak from corporations.

    You might say, letters have had their day.

    And yet, every year, people around the world get together on December 10, World Human Rights Day, to write letters. They write to people who are locked up unfairly – and to their family members. They write to the government leaders who put them there, and demand they release them.

    November 29, 2017

    The family of an LGBTI activist hacked to death in Bangladesh, the sister of a young man gunned down by Jamaican police, and 11 human rights defenders in Turkey are among those who will be receiving letters of support from Amnesty International supporters this December, as the organization launches its fifteenth global letter writing campaign, Write for Rights.

    Every December, Amnesty International supporters across the globe write millions of letters and take actions for people whose human rights are under attack, in what has become the world’s biggest human rights campaign. Last year at least 4.6 million actions were taken.

    “For 15 years Write for Rights has given people hope in their darkest moments. Imagine being ill in jail and receiving thousands of letters of support and solidarity; or finding out that people all over the world are behind you in your quest for justice for a murdered relative. Writing letters really can change lives,” said Salil Shetty, Amnesty International’s Secretary General.

    November 23, 2017
      Join activists around the world this Human Rights Day for a letter-writing marathon on Twitter and Instagram.

    Write for Rights is one of the world’s largest human rights events and on Human Rights Day we want the world to see how far and wide the campaign reaches, and all the great work we do to change lives.

    On or around December 10th, 2017 we will be using Twitter and Instagram to show that people all over the world are writing letters for those whose rights have been abused. You can find more information on Write for Rights cases here.

    Let’s show the world that human rights matter, by making the 2017 Write for Rights hashtag #WriteforRights appear in conversations online throughout the day!

    October 27, 2017
    Letters to a Prisoner (Owlkids 2017) is a wordless children’s book inspired by the Write for Rights campaign - created by Montreal author Jacques Goldstyn. The book illustrates the power of hope and the written word. The Youth and Activism Team has been actively collaborating in partnership with Owlkids Books to make this book available to the Amnesty Canada community.

    Letters to a Prisoner will provide a fun and engaging way for young people (ages 6 and up) to participate with and promote human rights and the Write for Rights campaign. 

    August 22, 2017
    Erkin Musaev, a former Uzbekistani government official and UN employee, who was tortured and then wrongly imprisoned by the authorities, has written a letter of thanks to Amnesty International following his early release from prison last week.

    Erkin Musaev was sentenced to 20 years in jail in 2007 after a series of grossly unfair trials – he was accused of spying for an unnamed NATO member-state and of misusing UN funds. His conviction was based on a confession he was forced to sign after security service officers threatened his family.

    Outraged at the injustice of his detention without a fair trial thousands of Amnesty International supporters sent 427,000 messages of solidarity for Erkin Musaev, demanding his release as part of Write for Rights 2014.

    Now free, he has written a letter offering his personal thanks to Amnesty International activists who spoke up for him:

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