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Good news: Southern African parliamentarians condemn attacks against persons with albinism

    August 13, 2019

    The Assembly of the Southern Africa Development Community - Parliamentary Forum (SADC-PF), an organization of parliamentarians from Southern African states, has spoken out against attacks, abductions, killings and discrimination against persons with albinism. On July 24, the organization adopted a motion condemning the attacks and discrimination.

    In recent years, Amnesty International has been a global leader in spotlighting and advocating on issues of persons with albinism. Amnesty has pressed governments in the Southern African region to address failures which leave people with albinism at the mercy of criminal gangs.

    Ritual killings of people with albinism are influenced by superstitions and myths that their bones or body parts can bring riches.

    This year, Amnesty has been working with the SADC-PF to ensure that the organization plays a stronger leadership role in building a society in which persons will albinism enjoy their human rights.

    Despite facing the highest number of attacks on persons with albinism, SADC member states have not yet successfully developed a coordinated approach in cross border collaboration for combatting and responding to attacks against persons with albinism.

    Amnesty believes that the SADC-PF's July 24 motion brings the region closer to addressing the cycle of human rights violations against persons with albinism.

    Amnesty is now calling for SADC member states to take further action to end the gruesome and tragic realities people with albinism live through.

    Read Amnesty's full statement: SADC-PF's adoption of motion on persons with albinism a positive signal.

    PHOTO: Annie Alfred (centre) with friends. Annie lives in Malawi and was an Amnesty Write for Rights case in 2016. Persons with albinism in Malawi often face deep-seated discrimination. © LAWILINK/Amnesty International