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Jerryme Corre is free!

    March 16, 2018

    Jerryme Corre is back home in Angeles City, Pampanga with his wife and step children after 6 years behind bars in the Philippines on false drug charges. Jerryme was subjected to ruthless torture at the hands of police in 2012 after being falsely arrested while visiting his aunt’s house on his day off. He was rushed by more than ten armed police officers in plainclothes, who beat him in the street before taking him back to a police station. There, they beat the soles of his feet with a wooden baton, removed his shorts and used them to suffocate him, ‘waterboarded’ him and zapped him with electric wires for hours. During his interrogation, they repeatedly called him by the wrong name. Eventually an official arrived to identify him and told police they had arrested the wrong man, but they charged him anyway, and forced him to sign a confession that he wasn’t allowed to read. Despite a court ruling in 2016 that he had been tortured by police, the drug charges against him were not dropped and he was forced to remain in jail until March 2nd, 2018 when a motion to dismiss his case was granted due to lack of evidence.

    Since his release he has been able to visit his mother who lives 4 hours away from Manila in Galera, Mondoro. He was also able to visit his father’s grave, which he had been longing to do, since his father died while he was in prison.

    On 27 March, thousands of appeals calling for justice for Jerryme Corre were handed over to the Philippines National Police (PNP) Internal Affairs Service (IAS)

    On 27 March 2015, thousands of appeals calling for justice for Jerryme Corre were handed over to the Philippines National Police (PNP) Internal Affairs Service (IAS)

    Jerryme was a one of the core cases of Amnesty’s Stop Torture campaign; he was also a Write for Rights case in 2014, when thousands of people from New Zealand, Belgium, Canada, South Korea, Spain, and from within the Philippines sent him letters of solidarity and appealed to the government for his release.