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Site C Dam

    Amnesty International Calgary would like to invite you to attend a night of information sharing and letter writing on February 23rd.

    We will be hosting a mini-writeathon in support of Amnesty Canada's "Halt Site C" campaign. The evening will include videos, petitions and the option to write letters to British Columbia's Premier, Christy Clark, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and other relevant ministers. We've included more information about the case below.

    Please RSVP on our Facebook page.

    The planned Site C dam in northeastern British Columbia is one of the largest resource development projects currently planned anywhere in Canada.

    Treat 8 Justice for the Peace Caravan wants Prime Minister Trudeau to keep his promises to First Nations.

    On September 12, the Federal Court of Appeal in Montreal will hear the latest legal challenge to the massive Site C hydroelectric dam already under construction on Treaty 8 territory in northeast British Columbia.First Nations leaders, elders and other community members from Treaty 8 are driving across Canada to focus attention of the importance of this case to the rights of all treaty nations and to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s promised new relationship with First Nations.

    The Justice for the Peace caravan is endorsed by the Assembly of First Nations British Columbia, the First Nations Leadership Summit, and the Union of BC Indian Chiefs.

    What’s at stake:

    •    Are governments in Canada accountable to spirit and intent of historic treaties when making decisions about large-scale resource development project?

    On September 12, the Federal Court of Appeal in Montreal will hear the latest legal challenge to the massive Site C hydroelectric dam already under construction on Treaty 8 territory in northeast British Columbia.

    First Nations community members from Treaty 8 are travelling by bus across Canada to focus attention of the importance of this case to the rights of all treaty nations and to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s promised new relationship with First Nations.

    On September 13, the caravan will arrive in Ottawa to mark the anniversary of the adoption by the United Nations of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples with a rally on Parliament Hill. 

    On September 12, the Federal Court of Appeal in Montreal will hear the latest legal challenge to the massive Site C hydroelectric dam already under construction on Treaty 8 territory in northeast British Columbia.

    First Nations community members from Treaty 8 are travelling by bus across Canada to focus attention of the importance of this case to the rights of all treaty nations and to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s promised new relationship with First Nations.

    Members of West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations will join with allies outside the courthouse to show support for this historic case. 

    A number of organizations are calling on their supporters to join this timely rally at BC Hydro headquarters in Vancouver. 

    The Peace River Valley in northeastern British Columbia is a unique ecosystem and one of the very few areas in the region that so far has been largely preserved from large-scale resource development. First Nations and Métis families and communities rely on the valley for hunting and fishing, gathering berries and sacred medicine, and holding ceremonies. Their ancestors are buried in this land.

    The proposed $8 billion plus Site C hydroelectric dam would flood more than 80 km of the river valley, stretching west from Fort St. John. The severe impact on Indigenous peoples is beyond dispute. A joint federal-province environmental impact assessment concluded that the dam would “severely undermine” use of the land, would make fishing unsafe for at least a generation, and would submerge burial grounds and other crucial cultural and historical sites.

    On September 12, the Federal Court of Appeal in Montreal will hear the latest legal challenge to the massive Site C hydroelectric dam already under construction on Treaty 8 territory in northeast British Columbia.

    First Nations community members from Treaty 8 are setting out today to travel by bus across Canada to focus attention of the importance of this case to the rights of all treaty nations and to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s promised new relationship with First Nations.

    After a rally on Parliament Hill in the morning, members of West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations will join with allies to celebrate a community feast in Ottawa. 

    The Paddle for the Peace is held annually to celebrate and recognize the need to protect the Valley and retain its critical ecosystem values in the face of the threat of the Site C dam.

    The Paddle is a day long event that begins on the Peace River, at the Halfway River Bridge on Highway 29, approximately a half hour drive from Fort St. John.

    You will start the day with a full, hearty breakfast, sponsored by the West Moberly First Nations at the launch site between 9 and 11 a.m. Following breakfast, keynote speakers and dignitaries will address the need to protect this precious valley.  The canoes and safety boats will launch at noon. You will enjoy a leisurely 1.5 hour paddle or cruise through this incredibly scenic river valley alongside hundreds of others who care deeply for it. The paddle culminates at Bear Flat and will be followed by a BBQ lunch hosted by the Prophet River First Nations, keynote speakers, musical entertainment as well as the opportunity to visit with other event participants.

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