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Botswana

    February 22, 2018
    Amnesty International publishes State of the World’s Human Rights report for 2017 to 2018 “Last year our world was immersed in crises, with prominent leaders offering us a nightmarish vision of a society blinded by hatred and fear. This emboldened those who promote bigotry, but it inspired far more people to campaign for a more hopeful future,” says Salil Shetty, head of Amnesty International

    The world is reaping the terrifying consequences of hate-filled rhetoric that threatens to normalize massive discrimination against marginalized groups, Amnesty International warned today as it launched its annual assessment of human rights.

    Nevertheless, the organization found that a growing movement of both first-time and seasoned activists campaigning for social justice provides real hope of reversing the slide towards oppression.

    The report, The State of the World’s Human Rights, covers 159 countries and delivers the most comprehensive analysis of the state of human rights in the world today.

    October 07, 2015

    Botswana’s authorities must lift the suspension of four High Court judges unfairly targeted if the independence of the judiciary is to be preserved, said Amnesty International and SADC Lawyers’ Association today following a High Court decision yesterday not to reinstate them.

    The judges, Key Dingake, Mercy Thebe, Rainer Busanang and Modiri Letsididi were suspended on 28 August 2015 under Section 97 of the Botswana Constitution for alleged misconduct and bringing the judiciary into disrepute. This followed a petition signed by 12 judges, including the suspended four, calling for the impeachment of Chief Justice Maruping Dibotelo.

    November 14, 2014

    The High Court judgment overturning Botswana’s Department of Labour and Home Affairs’ refusal to register an organization representing the rights of LGBTI people is a triumph for justice and a victory over state homophobia, said Amnesty International today.

    Lesbian, Gays and Bisexuals of Botswana (LEGABIBO) brought the case against the government arguing that the refusal to register their organization violated their constitutional rights, including their rights to freedom of association, freedom of expression, and equal protection of the law.

    “This High Court ruling is a triumph for justice and a victory over state homophobia. It re-affirms the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people in Botswana to organize and advocate for their human rights without being subjected to unfair treatment,” said Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s Director for the Southern African region.

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