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Georgia

    May 17, 2013

    Police in the Georgian capital Tbilisi failed to protect  lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) activists as thousands of people violently attacked a Pride event today in what Amnesty International said was an ineffective response to organized and violent homophobia.

    Georgian LGBTI activists were assembling in the capital's Pushkin park for a peaceful rally to mark the International Day against Homophobia and Transphobia (IDAHO) when the event was cut short by a throng of angry counter-protesters reported to number in the thousands.

    The ensuing violence resulted in 17 people being injured – 12 of whom were hospitalized, including three policemen and a journalist.

    “Ironically this shameful violence marred a day that is meant to mark solidarity in the face of homophobic violence around the world, and it shows that the Georgian authorities have a long way to go to promote tolerance and protect LGBTI people and their human rights,” said John Dalhuisen, Europe and Central Asia Programme Director at Amnesty International.

    Human Rights Don't Discriminate

    LGBTI rights are human rights

    A person's sexual orientation or gender identity can lead to abuse in the form of discrimination, violence, imprisonment, torture, or even execution, and these abuses are all illegal under international human rights law. Amnesty International works to protect the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) individuals by shining a light on rights abuses, calling for policy change, and working to protect LGBTI human rights defenders. Amnesty International considers anyone imprisoned solely because of homosexuality to be prisoners of conscience who should be immediately and unconditionally released.

    URGENT: TAKE ACTION NOW BY CALLING ON CHECHNYA TO STOP ABDUCTING, KILLING AND TORTURING GAY MEN!

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