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Nigeria

    February 05, 2013

    Hundreds of fatal police shootings which each year leave families anguished and bereaved are not being investigated effectively because of a failure of the Nigerian justice system, Amnesty International says in a report released today.

    Nigeria: No Justice for the Dead illustrates the gaps in the investigation of deaths following police action in Rivers State where basic techniques of crime scene protection and investigation are not applied and autopsies and inquests are either not carried out or are inadequate.

    Relatives are often left with no answers about the fate of their family members and rarely receive justice.
    Amnesty International believes Rivers State is representative of other Nigerian states where violent deaths at the hands of the police are not investigated adequately. 

    Medical and legal sources revealed that there is a practice of doctors signing death investigation reports without examining the body properly.

    In many cases the identity of the deceased is not known to the police and bodies are registered as “unknown”. Little effort is made by police to identify them.

    February 01, 2013

    This week’s ruling by a Dutch court in a case brought by four Nigerian farmers against the oil company Shell for pollution damage represents a small victory – but also underlines the real-world challenges facing victims of pollution and human rights abuses involving multinational companies.

    The four farmers who brought the case had seen their livelihoods destroyed by oil pollution from Shell’s operations.

    The court found in favour of one plaintiff, stating that Shell Nigeria had breached its duty of care in that case by failing to take reasonable action to prevent third parties tampering with oil wells and causing oil spills. Shell will now have to pay compensation to the affected farmer.

    While sabotage of oil pipelines in the Niger Delta is one cause of pollution, it’s not nearly such a major issue as Shell’s public relations machine likes to make out. Many spills are caused by leaks from pipelines that are old and poorly maintained, and Shell’s claims about the extent to which sabotage causes pollution have been strongly challenged by communities and NGOs, including Amnesty International.

    December 17, 2012
    Amnesty International and Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project (SERAP) have hailed lthe ECOWAS Court of Justice ground-breaking judgment as a “key moment in holding governments and companies to account for pollution.”

    In the case, SERAP v. Nigeria, the Court unanimously found the Nigerian government responsible for abuses by oil companies and makes it clear the government must hold the companies and other perpetrators to account.

    Hey everybody!

    Did you know that Shell Oil company has been extracting oil in the NIger Delta for over 50 years? And that there are hundreds of spills in the region every year, causing huge harm to the local population?

    On Novemeber 10th we will be marking the 20th anniversary of the execution of Ken Saro Wiwa, an activist that fought for the rights of the Ogoni people in the Niger Delta area: he protested against the exploitation and violation of human rights caused by the operations of multinationals such as Shell.

    There will be:
    - a presentation
    - a discussion session
    - a letter writing session
    and....
    FREE PIZZA!!

    “We breathe polluted air. We drink polluted water. We farm in contaminated land and eat contaminated crops. We live in a contaminated environment. All because of oil pollution.” – Community activist, Niger Delta 

    In collaboration with AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL VANCOUVER

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