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    June 05, 2014

    The Peruvian authorities must ensure that all those suspected of criminal responsibility in the tragic events in Bagua are brought to justice, said Amnesty International today on the fifth anniversary of the violence which left 33 people dead.

    Demonstrators and police were killed when police clashed with Indigenous People protesting against a series of laws allowing for the exploitation of natural resources on ancestral land in 2009.

    During the violence 23 officers lost their lives along with 10 civilians. Hundreds more were injured. So far only protesters have been brought to trial.

    “If the Peruvian authorities are truly committed to bringing to justice those suspected of criminal responsibility for these deaths, it is not enough to punish the protesters and ignore possible abuses by the police,” said Guadalupe Marengo, Amnesty International’s Americas Deputy Programme Director.

    Violence broke out on 5 June 2009 when police moved in to break up a roadblock on a stretch of road known as the Curva del Diablo near Bagua in the Amazonas department, Peru.

    Free screening of the film DAUGHTER OF THE LAKE.

    At the height of the Peruvian gold rush, Nelida, an Andean woman able to communicate with water spirits, uses her powers to prevent a mining corporation from destroying the body of water she considers her mother.

    A gold deposit valued at billions of dollars lies just beneath Nelida’s lakes and leads farmers and Latin America’s biggest gold producer into conflict.

    Panel discussion to follow, speakers to be announced. Presented by Amnesty International.

    JUST ANNOUNCED: AI Canada Secretary General Alex Neve will be joining the panel!



    Join us for the Karuara tour, organized in support of Kukama Indigenous activists who are protecting their rivers and culture in Peru’s northern Amazon region from extractive and exploitative industries. “Karuara” means people of the river in the Kukama language, and refers to the sacred guardians of the Amazon’s waterways.

    Mari Luz Canaquiri Murayari, president of the Kukama Women’s Federation, will be traveling across the province during October with filmmakers Miguel Araoz and Stephanie Boyd. For the past 20 years Mari Luz has been protecting rivers in the Amazon from oil exploration, dredging, and other mega-projects such as hydroelectric dams. The trio will present their short film Parana-The River, which highlights Mari Luz’s tireless work to defend the Marañon River and her culture. They will also present a book of traditional Kukama stories, illustrated by children and entitled Karuara, People of the River (2016). 


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