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South Africa

    August 28, 2017
      In response to the guilty verdict on the coffin assault case by the Middleburg High Court earlier today, Amnesty International South Africa Executive Director Shenilla Mohamed said:   “This hideous case lays bare the discrimination that still runs deep in South African society. The fact that the whole grotesque episode was captured on video and then posted to social media suggests that the perpetrators felt little concern that they would face justice.   “There is no place for racism or discrimination in any society, and this terrible case must spur the government to finalize the Hate Crimes legislation in order to deal decisively with incidents of discrimination.”   Background   Two men were arrested after forcing Victor Mlotshwa into a coffin, and threatening to pour petrol over him in August 2016.   They were charged with kidnapping, assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm and attempted murder and were put on trial at the Delmas regional court in Mpumalanga province.
    August 15, 2017
      ·         No one has been prosecuted for the killing of 34 striking mineworkers and injury to at least 70 others ·         Miners and their families are still living in inadequate housing and squalid conditions ·         Authorities must ensure victims and relatives are properly compensated   Victims of the bloody tragedy at Marikana, in which 34 protesters were killed and at least 70 were injured by members of the South African Police Service (SAPS) during a mining strike, are still awaiting justice five years on, Amnesty International said today.  The organization is calling on the South African authorities to ensure that those suspected of criminal responsibility in relation to the killings on 16 August 2012are brought to trial, and that the victims and their families receive reparations, including adequate compensation.  
    July 06, 2017
      In response to today’s finding by the International Criminal Court’s Pre-Trial Chamber that South Africa should have executed the arrest warrant against Sudanese president Omar Al-Bashir when he visited in June 2015, Amnesty International’s Africa Director for Research and Advocacy, Netsanet Belay said,   “Today’s finding confirms what everyone, including South African authorities, knew all along. Al-Bashir does not have immunity from arrest and all states parties to the Rome Statute must arrest him the minute he steps onto their territory and hand him over to the ICC. “It is shocking that other states parties such as Jordan are also failing in their obligations to arrest Al-Bashir and this decision makes it clear that they do so in flagrant violation of international law. “South Africa breached its international and domestic legal obligations when it failed to arrest Al-Bashir. No state should follow this example. There must be no impunity for crimes under international law.
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