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Liberia

    July 05, 2018

    Submission to UN Human Rights Committee Focuses on Accountability

    The Liberian government should undertake fair and credible prosecutions of international crimes committed during its two civil wars, 76 Liberian, African, and international nongovernmental organizations said in a submission to the United Nations Human Rights Committee released today.

    The submission was made ahead of Liberia’s appearance before the committee, which monitors implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights by its states parties, scheduled for July 9-10, 2018 in Geneva.

    “Since the war ended in 2003, the Liberian government has skirted the issue of criminal accountability for war crimes,” said Hassan Bility, executive director of the Monrovia-based Global Justice and Research Project. “Not one person has been prosecuted for past violations.”

    April 20, 2018

    Responding to the 30-year jail sentence handed to Mohammed Jabateh, a former Liberian war lord known as “Jungle Jabbah” now living in the US, for immigration fraud and perjury due to failure to disclose his involvement in human rights abuses during the Liberian civil war, Amnesty International’s West Africa Researcher Sabrina Mahtani said:

    “While Mohammed Jabateh was not convicted of the crimes he is allegedly responsible for under international law, this is nevertheless the first case to provide some justice for victims of Liberia’s civil war. Such prosecutions send a strong signal that the US does not have to be a safe haven for human rights abusers.

    February 22, 2018
    Amnesty International publishes State of the World’s Human Rights report for 2017 to 2018 “Last year our world was immersed in crises, with prominent leaders offering us a nightmarish vision of a society blinded by hatred and fear. This emboldened those who promote bigotry, but it inspired far more people to campaign for a more hopeful future,” says Salil Shetty, head of Amnesty International

    The world is reaping the terrifying consequences of hate-filled rhetoric that threatens to normalize massive discrimination against marginalized groups, Amnesty International warned today as it launched its annual assessment of human rights.

    Nevertheless, the organization found that a growing movement of both first-time and seasoned activists campaigning for social justice provides real hope of reversing the slide towards oppression.

    The report, The State of the World’s Human Rights, covers 159 countries and delivers the most comprehensive analysis of the state of human rights in the world today.

    November 10, 2014

    By Dr. Shobana Ananth, Health Network Coordinator and Jacqueline Hansen, Major Campaigns and Women’s Rights Campaigner

    The Ebola epidemic is spreading rapidly in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone and threatens to spread further. Over 13,000 cases have been reported in eight countries this year, and almost 5,000 people have died. Current projections suggest there could be 10,000 cases—and 5,000 deaths—per week by December.

    Health systems in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone were already weak from years of armed conflict. They suffer from shortages in funding, staff, a lack of health care workers, and poor infrastructure. And now they are collapsing under the strain of responding to the Ebola virus. Without financial support and increased humanitarian and medical staff, the epidemic will continue to expand and many more lives will be lost.

    September 26, 2013

     The decision of the Special Court for Sierra Leone’s Appeal Chamber to uphold the conviction of former Liberian President Charles Taylor sends a clear message to leaders across the world that no-one is immune from justice, Amnesty International said today.

    “The Court’s landmark ruling underlines that no-one is above the law. The conviction of those responsible for crimes committed during Sierra Leone’s conflict has brought some measure of justice for the tens of thousands of victims,” said Stephanie Barbour, head of Amnesty International's Centre for International Justice in The Hague.

    “The conviction of Charles Taylor must pave the way for further prosecutions.”

    Taylor's sentence of 50 years was upheld by the Appeal Chamber as fair and reasonable in the totality of the circumstances.

    The Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) was established through an agreement between the United Nations and the state in 2002. Its remit was to prosecute crimes under international law committed in Sierra Leone since 30 November 1996.

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